beer or beers

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beer or beers

Post by Archived Topic » Thu Dec 16, 2004 8:47 am

"King of beers." This Budwieser slogan has caused many a bar debate. If this brewing process produces a Czech Budwiess (spell check) then should it be "king of Budwieses. "king of porters", "king of Stouts" so on....
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beer or beers

Post by Archived Reply » Thu Dec 16, 2004 9:01 am

I feel bad that this topic has been ignored for so long. I think that Beer would be a more generic term, which would include porter, stout, ale, etc. If we are going to take Budweiser to task for anything, it should be for their tasteless light beer...but that's another topic altogether.

JF 12/21/2004
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beer or beers

Post by dalehileman » Sun Mar 06, 2005 11:49 pm

I do too. Anyone wishing to discuss beer, I am dalehileman@verizon.net
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beer or beers

Post by russcable » Mon Mar 07, 2005 5:51 am

Keep in mind that up until the fairly recent (last 10 years or so) explosion of micro-breweries, almost all (possibly even all) mass-produced brand-name American-made beers sold in stores and bars and restaurants were basically pilsner lagers - Budweiser, Miller, Coors, Busch, Pabst, Sheaffer, etc. etc. etc. Even now that the major breweries produce more varieties, they are still overwhelmingly just slightly altered versions of the same thing, Lite's, Genuine Draft's, Ice-Brewed's, Select, Caffiene-Added etc. pilsner lagers. To a lot of American's pilsner lager is "beer" and all the other things are "that imported stuff them feriners drink, and I hear they likes it WARM!"
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beer or beers

Post by Erik_Kowal » Mon Mar 07, 2005 7:33 am

Speaking as the native of a country whose national drink is beer in all its various forms, I must nevertheless assert that the best stable of beers I know of is made in the USA -- to be precise, by the New Belgium Brewing Company of Fort Collins, Colorado, which happens also to be Ken's home town. In my view, their Trippel (a thrice-brewed full-bodied lager), Frambozen (a raspberry-flavoured brown ale) and Brussels Black Ale (a kind of stout) stand head and shoulders above any similar-style beers from anywhere else around the world. Red Hook IPA (a hoppy pale ale) from a micro-brewery near Seattle is also an excellent product, and there are probably many other good American micro-brews that I have yet to discover.

So even American beer drinkers need not cry too much into the insipid slops that Russ has referred to. At least when you're drinking at home, there's plenty of other stuff that can be enjoyed, though in semi-dry states such as Kansas, the only beer you can buy in a supermarket is the heavily-promoted mass-market 3% ghost beer that Russ mentioned -- real beer (and wine) must be bought in a liquor store.
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beer or beers

Post by Wizard of Oz » Mon Mar 07, 2005 9:01 am

.. Erik are you trying to gain a green card or something ?? .. your tongue stretches all the way across the Atlantic and into Ken's local .. local what I won't say .. *grin* .. best in the World ?? .. givus a break .. so how many beers have you actually tasted ?? .. any NZ or Aussie beers ?? .. besides the Fosters joke that we flood the Pommie market with ..

WoZ of Aus 07/03/05
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beer or beers

Post by Bobinwales » Mon Mar 07, 2005 3:39 pm

Now we really are talking about a subject near to my heart. The odd drop of the stuff has been known to pass my lips.
Without going into too much detail, we in the UK brew a beer that ferments on the surface at a warmer temperature, and ages for quite a short time. The beer tends to be less carbonated, full bodied, fruity, and robust. It is of course served cool, (as opposed to ice-cold), and usually has a higher alcohol content than lagers.
The beers brewed in both the USA and Australia are most often lagers, bottom fermented at cooler temperatures, and as the name suggests (German – warehouse) take longer to age. They are usually lighter in colour and flavour, and are often lower in alcohol. They are served so cold that the flavour is totally obliterated.
I shall be delighted to initiate any visitor to Wales in the delights of British Beer.
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beer or beers

Post by Phil White » Mon Mar 07, 2005 7:13 pm

Bob,

Done! You paying?
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Non sum felix lepus

beer or beers

Post by Bobinwales » Mon Mar 07, 2005 8:55 pm

Would going Dutch start a different thread?

But then it would be well worth it to try Cwrw Cymru (Welsh beer)
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beer or beers

Post by Wizard of Oz » Mon Mar 07, 2005 9:04 pm

Bob .. way off the mark .. in Aus we have both New and Old beers and this refers not, as some people think, to how long they ferment but to the fact that "New" beers introduced a new, different method of fermenting that produced a differnt style of beer .. New beers are lighter in colour than Old beers .. dark beer ??? .. I was suckled at the breast, me dear old Mum was a barmaid, consuming Tooheys Black like any self-respecting Novocastrian .. the water used ran over the tailings from the pits to give it its black colour .. *grin* .. ok ok so a bit of folk etymology there .. I do agree that in recent years the big breweries have decimated the local brewery market but there is a revolt amongst drinkers who are looking for something without all the chemicals and the rise of boutique breweries is well and truely underway .. ever tried any of the Coopers brews from South Aus ?? .. or Monteiths from the NZ South Island West Coast ?? .. so many beers and so little time .. *grin* .. and as to the temperature of the beer ?? .. well a lighter style beer served icy cold when the average temperature inside is a solid 30+°C goes down a treat mate after a hard days slog ..
WoZ of Aus 08/03/05
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beer or beers

Post by dalehileman » Tue Mar 08, 2005 12:45 am

Jeff: A generic term for the whole caboodle is "Brew"

Russ: I didn't like any of the old U>S> standbys; too dry and flavorless for me; except maybe Anchor Steam and Carling's Red Cap ale. However, many of the micro products are pretty good. Do try Lagunitas Czeck-Style Pils

Erik: I like all the IPA's

Will we get into trouble for this thread
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beer or beers

Post by Bobinwales » Tue Mar 08, 2005 9:10 am

Sorry Wiz, I see Australian names on the taps on British bars (I'm not naive enough to think that the stuff that comes out of them bears any resemblance to the beer you get) and never having been down there myself I thought that bottom fermented lagers were the norm. I am delighted to hear that brewing is still an art there. Iechyd da.

Dale, I am always getting into trouble when someone mentions beer, so what's new?
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beer or beers

Post by dalehileman » Tue Mar 08, 2005 11:48 pm

Bob--Start a beer website and you'll immediately have two faithful subscribers
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beer or beers

Post by Edwin Ashworth » Wed Mar 09, 2005 4:39 pm

Hey, the Internet Police are going ballistic about the public's downloading MUSIC!
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beer or beers

Post by Bobinwales » Thu Mar 10, 2005 12:52 pm

You mean we could download beer?

It mould make for some very strange pubs, and would give another meaning entirely to the term floppy drive.
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Bob in Wales

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