Crossfire

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Crossfire

Post by Archived Topic » Sun Jan 06, 2002 4:22 am

Could someone much more attuned than I to hyperbole please translate this?

"Like the coupe, the Crossfire Roadster shares a distinctive character line that moves precisely and rapidly from front to rear. The character line 'crosses' to a negative formation as it travels from the front through the rear fender, hence, the name 'Crossfire'."

Never mind the grammar and syntax such as the construction of the first sentence or the punctuation in the second.
Submitted by dale hileman (Apple Valley, CA - U.S.A.)
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Crossfire

Post by Archived Reply » Sun Jan 06, 2002 4:37 am

Dale, After putting your quote into context, it seems pretty clear what Daimler-Chrysler is trying to say. If you read the whole article, we have “The Crossfire Roadster's rear view is instantly recognizable with its tapered, "boat tail" appearance . . . .� So they are trying to tell prospective customers that their hot little car has that sporty look of the roadsters of old which were often characterized as ‘boat tails.’ The name ‘boat tail’ or ‘boattail’ comes from the tapered back of the stern of a boat, but has come to refer to the cylindrical section of a body that gradually decreases in diameter toward the tail to reduce aerodynamic drag. It is often used to refer to the ‘boattail bullet,’ ‘the boattail ski,’ and the auto body style the ‘boattail.’ Many roadsters of old were referred to as ‘boattails’ (e.g. the 1930 Duesenberg Boattail Speedster) and it is still a popular car body shape today. So ‘the character line crossing to a negative formation’ [getting narrower] as it travels from the front through the rear fender, is no great surprise because that is what boattails are supposed to do. And some hotshot ad agency guy who came up with this brilliant line of reasoning culminating in ‘Crossfire’ probably got stock options and a bonus. And, of course, any prospective owner on acid will immediately recognize the connection!

Ken G, October 30, 2004




Reply from Ken Greenwald (Fort Collins, CO - U.S.A.)
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Crossfire

Post by Archived Reply » Sun Jan 06, 2002 4:51 am

Thank you Ken
I hate to clutter up WW as I know you always go directly to the source; I would expect nothing less

But I had hoped to elicit some comment on the hyperbole

You seem to be confirming my guess that "character line" means cross-sectional area, "crosses" means "changes", and "negative formation" means "smaller diameter"
However, if you bring up the cut, you will see that it appears to taper toward the front not the rear

Thus the blurb is a polyfactoid
Reply from dale hileman (Apple Valley, CA - U.S.A.)
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Crossfire

Post by Archived Reply » Sun Jan 06, 2002 5:05 am

Dale, I find it hard to tell from the picture, but I see nothing all that dramatic going on. I'd need either an aerial view or a direct rear view to resolve the issue.

Ken G, October 31, 2004

Reply from Ken Greenwald (Fort Collins, CO - U.S.A.)
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Crossfire

Post by Archived Reply » Sun Jan 06, 2002 5:20 am

Aha: What you're saying is that granted, from the side it would be described as tapering toward the front, but from the top one might draw a different conclusion

You're setting a trap for me, aren't you
Reply from dale hileman (Apple Valley, CA - U.S.A.)
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