Garbanzo beans vs. chickpeas

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Garbanzo beans vs. chickpeas

Post by Archived Topic » Fri Jan 04, 2002 5:34 am

Do you know why "garbanzo beans" and "chickpeas" are interchangeable, and what the origin of each is?
Submitted by David Gest (Woodland Hills - U.S.A.)
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Garbanzo beans vs. chickpeas

Post by Archived Reply » Fri Jan 04, 2002 5:49 am

.. a rather simple explanation David .. they are alternative names for the same pulse .. Chickpea is the common name for "cicer arietinum" and was originally native to west Asia being introduced to the New World by the Spaniards (one of the good things they introduced) .. it now can be found as Garbanzo beans, Bengal gram, Desi chickpea, Kaala chana and Kabit chana throughout the world .. when ground it becomes a flour named Besan .. so there you have it ..
(Source: What Food Is That. J Rogers. 1990)
WoZ of Aus. 22/09/04
Reply from Wizard of Oz (Newcastle - Australia)
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Garbanzo beans vs. chickpeas

Post by Archived Reply » Fri Jan 04, 2002 6:03 am

David, It is not all that unusual for the same thing, including foods, to have more than one name (e.g. scallions/green onions; pop/soda; frankfurter/hot dog/wiener). ‘Garbanzo beans’ are somewhat unusual, though, in that they have so many names. I have also known them as ‘chick-peas’ and ‘chi-chi’ beans, but, in addition, they are variously known as chestnut beans, chich, dwarf pea, calavance and garavance. In India it has the name ‘gram’ or ‘Bengal gram.’ When I was growing up in New York city, street vendors used to sell them roasted and salted in paper cones from pushcarts and they were called ‘chi-chi’ beans.

The ‘chick pea’ is the older name and was earlier called the ‘cich-pea’ or ‘chich-pea’ (1548), which derives from Middle English ‘chiche,’ which was adopted from Middle French ‘chiche’ (also ‘cice’) from Latin ‘cicer,’ chickpea + pea, which all refer to the same bean

The name ‘garbanzo’ (1841, but ‘garvanzo in 1759) came from the Spanish name for the bean, which was an alteration (probably influenced by Old Spanish ‘garroba carob’ from Arabic ‘kharrubah’) of Old Spanish ‘arvanco,’ perhaps of Germanic origin, akin to Old High German ‘araweiz,’ pea.

<1548 “‘Cicer’ may be named in english CICH, or CICHE pease, after the frenche tonge.”—‘Names of Herbes’ by Turner>

<1605 “Beanes, lentill, and CHICH-pease”—‘Remains of a Great Work Concerning Britain’ by Camden, page 64>

<before 1722 “Of CHICK PEAS and chicklings, and peas three modii.”—‘Observations in Husbandry’ (1752) by Lisle, page 89> [[Note: The ‘chick’ in ‘chick peas’ has nothing to do with chickens or ‘chicklings (small chickens). The ‘chicklings’ that sometimes appears in connection with ‘chick peas’ derives from a variation on a bona fide form in the ‘chick peas’ family, ‘cichlynge’ (also formerly seen as ‘cichelinges,’ ‘chichlings’)]]

<1759 “The same success attended the experiments made with . . . GARVANZO, or a kind of pease.”—translation of ‘Venegas’s Natural and Civil History of California,’ I. page 45>

<1841 “A puchéra, the ingredients of which were beef, bacon, GARBANZOS, and berdolaga.”—‘Zincali’ by G. Borrow, I. vi. page104>

(Merriam-Webster’s Unabridged Dictionary, Random House Unabridged Dictionary, Oxford English
Dictionary)
________________________

Ken G – September 21, 2004
Reply from Ken Greenwald (Fort Collins, CO - U.S.A.)
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Garbanzo beans vs. chickpeas

Post by Archived Reply » Fri Jan 04, 2002 6:17 am

Interestingly (and confusingly) there IS a bean called the "chickling pea", the seed of the Blue Sweet-Pea plant which has become notorious over the centuries as it resembles an edible pea or bean, but when eaten (usually in desperation in times of famine) causes irreversible brain damage in humans.
Reply from Simon Beck (London - England)
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