bones of a hen

This is the place to post questions and discussions on usage and style. The members of the Wordwizard Clubhouse will also often be able to help you to formulate that difficult letter.
Post Reply

bones of a hen

Post by navi » Thu Jan 14, 2021 10:41 am

Are these sentences correct:
1) He used bones of a hen to make an amulet.
2) He used bones of hens to make amulets.

How are the different from:
1a) He used the bones of a hen to make an amulet.
2a) He used the bones of hens to make amulets.

Gratefully,
Navi
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS

Re: bones of a hen

Post by Phil White » Thu Jan 14, 2021 2:30 pm

They all seem okay to me.

In reality, there is no difference between 1 and 1a or 2 and 2a. Sentences 1a and 2a do not imply that all the bones were used (which you may expect in other contexts).

In all cases, it would probably be more natural to say "hens' bones" or "a hen's bones".
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS
Signature: Phil White
Non sum felix lepus

Re: bones of a hen

Post by Erik_Kowal » Thu Jan 14, 2021 6:35 pm

To my mind, "bones from a chicken" or "chicken bones" would be the most obvious formulations, unless the construction of the amulet specifically required bones from a hen rather than from a cockerel.

In my experience, the bones from a chicken (of either sex) are insufficiently durable for amulets. I've found the teeth of hens to be more hard-wearing than those of cockerels, and I have found the teeth of both sexes to be a lot more hard-wearing than their bones. So I would strongly recommend hens' teeth the next time you need to construct an amulet. (Tip: You'll need an HSS drill bit or diamond-tipped bit to drill into a hen's tooth -- assuming you intend to string them together. Regular wood-boring bits just aren't up to the job.)
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS

Re: bones of a hen

Post by Bobinwales » Sat Jan 16, 2021 12:16 am

He made amulets out of hens' bones.
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS
Signature: All those years gone to waist!
Bob in Wales

ACCESS_END_OF_TOPIC
Post Reply