with Freud

This is the place to post questions and discussions on usage and style. The members of the Wordwizard Clubhouse will also often be able to help you to formulate that difficult letter.
Post Reply

with Freud

Post by navi » Thu Sep 17, 2020 10:13 pm

1) With Freud, he believed in the existence of unconscious drives.
2) Along with Freud, he believed in the existence of unconscious drives.

3) Like Freud, he believed in the existence of unconscious drives.

Does '1' imply that they were associated? Does it imply they were contemporaries?
How about '2'?
Do '1' or '2' imply that he was an associate or a disciple of Freud's?


Gratefully,
Navi
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS

Re: with Freud

Post by trolley » Fri Sep 18, 2020 12:49 am

I don't think any of them imply anything other than agreement. Two and three (to me) mean the same thing but one is something different. "With Freud, he believed in the existence of unconscious drives."...but without Freud, he didn't? "With" doesn't mean the same as "along with" or "as with".
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS

Re: with Freud

Post by Erik_Kowal » Fri Sep 18, 2020 2:28 am

I prefer to stay awake when I'm driving.

Unlike this fellow: https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-54197344
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS

ACCESS_END_OF_TOPIC
Post Reply