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Slide and slip

Posted: Mon Mar 25, 2019 9:54 am
by Stevenloan
"Apparently, Marvel tried many times to get their hands on actor Joaquin Phoenix, but he kept sliding out of their grasp. The producers first wanted Phoenix to play The Hulk/Bruce Banner, but as we all know, the part when to Mark Ruffalo instead. Marvel then tried to cast Phoenix as Dr. Stephen Strange, but once again he turned it down."

- Hi everyone! I Googled and there was no results for "slide out of one's grasp" but "slip from one's grasp". Which phrase sounds more common and more natural?

Thanks so much!

StevenLoan

Re: Slide and slip

Posted: Mon Mar 25, 2019 2:43 pm
by Erik_Kowal
My own searches appeared to corroborate the prevalence of "slip from [one's] grasp" over both "slide out of [one's] grasp" and "slide from [one's] grasp".

To me, they are all acceptable, and none of them sounds unnatural. However, it does seem that the usual idiom that expresses this notion is "slip from [one's] grasp".

Re: Slide and slip

Posted: Mon Mar 25, 2019 3:49 pm
by tony h
My expectation is that things
- slip from one's grasp/fingers
- escape from one's clutches
- slide out of reach"

Re: Slide and slip

Posted: Mon Mar 25, 2019 6:17 pm
by Shelley
I've always heard the expression as, ". . . slipped through one's fingers." This version shows up on a google search as an idiom.
Of course, Paul Simon would have it both ways: Y'know, the nearer your destination, the more you're slip sliding away.

Re: Slide and slip

Posted: Wed Mar 27, 2019 3:39 am
by Stevenloan
Erik, tony h and Shelley: Thank you all very much for your help. I really appreciate it.

StevenLoan