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Clothes hangers

Posted: Sat Feb 09, 2019 3:27 pm
by Stevenloan
Image

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1. http://thanhluan.net/san-pham/moc-ao-inox-mo-01/
2. https://www.adayroi.com/bo-5-moc-ao-ino ... -p-1150639

Hi everyone! What do you call these two different types of clothes hanger? The type in the first picture doesn't have two dents on both sides. The type in the second picture has two dents on both sides.

Thanks so much!

StevenLoan

Re: Clothes hangers

Posted: Sat Feb 09, 2019 9:20 pm
by Shelley
Generally, these devices are all just lumped together and called hangers, Stevenloan. But, if you want to be precise, the hangers with the notches (you call them "dents") along the shoulder are designed for dresses, and can be called "dress hangers". Even though the ones in the top picture have what seems to be a belt-hook built right into them, I wouldn't call them "pants hangers". Pants hangers usually have an extra bar along the bottom which the folded pants hang on, and there's a notch the bar tucks into that keeps the pants from slipping. I'd give you a picture, but I'm not finding one easily. Often, pants hangers consist of nothing but the bar.

Hope that helps.

Re: Clothes hangers

Posted: Sun Feb 10, 2019 4:00 pm
by Stevenloan
Shelley : Thank you very much for your answer. It really helps.

StevenLoan

Re: Clothes hangers

Posted: Sun Feb 10, 2019 5:35 pm
by tony h
Shelley wrote:
Sat Feb 09, 2019 9:20 pm
Pants hangers usually have an extra bar along the bottom which the folded pants hang on, and there's a notch the bar tucks into that keeps the pants from slipping.
It would never occur to me to hang pants on a hanger. As far as I am aware the common expectation is that they would be kept in drawers.

:)

Re: Clothes hangers

Posted: Tue Feb 12, 2019 12:13 am
by Bobinwales
Nice one Tony. I always smile when I hear the word, "pants" in Amglish.
For the benefit of non native speakers, pants in American English are trousers in the UK, Australia, New Zealand etc. "Pants" to us are underwear.

Re: Clothes hangers

Posted: Tue Feb 12, 2019 1:58 am
by Stevenloan
tony h : Thanks for your post. Bob : Thanks for letting me know the difference between pants and trousers.

StevenLoan

Re: Clothes hangers

Posted: Tue Feb 12, 2019 11:49 am
by tony h
Stevenloan wrote:
Tue Feb 12, 2019 1:58 am
Thanks for letting me know the difference between pants and trousers.
Just in case you hadn't picked up on the differences between English in America and English in England You might find this useful. (I have no real idea how accurate the American usages are.)
In particular compare top right to bottom left.

Image

Re: Clothes hangers

Posted: Tue Feb 12, 2019 9:43 pm
by Bobinwales
Much the same in Wales and Scotland Tony.

Re: Clothes hangers

Posted: Wed Feb 13, 2019 4:52 pm
by Stevenloan
tony h : Thanks a lot for the huge picture about the difference between American English and British English. It's very useful.

StevenLoan

Re: Clothes hangers

Posted: Wed Feb 13, 2019 9:50 pm
by Shelley
Bobinwales wrote:
Tue Feb 12, 2019 12:13 am
. . . pants in American English are trousers in the UK, Australia, New Zealand etc. "Pants" to us are underwear.
Well, tony h's comment went right over my head! Thanks for clarifying, Bobinwales. And hardee har-har, tony h!

So, I have a few corrections to make about the chart that tony h has posted:

"Wife-beater" is wrong on sooo many levels. Please do not use that name, ever, for what is usually called a "tank top".

Items listed as "briefs" or "Jockey shorts" (Jockey is a brand-name) are also called "whitey tighties". Though it probably has to do with the color of the briefs, "whitey" would be a racist term in another context. If anyone knows whether the reference is racist, then enlighten us, please.

I don't think I've ever heard an American speaker of English call rain boots, or rubber boots, "gumboots". I'm going to look more closely at that later.

The American word for the lacy loop to hold one's stocking up is simply a "garter". A "garter belt" is something else entirely.

The orange job at the end is definitely NOT "boxers" in Amglish. Boxer shorts are roomy box-shaped shorts that contrast with the tight briefs above. It's the big either/or question: briefs or boxers? "Boxers" might come from the shorts that fighters wear in the ring (not wrestlers, boxers), but I don't know -- and I don't have time to research it right now.

Re: Clothes hangers

Posted: Thu Feb 14, 2019 1:21 am
by tony h
Shelley thank you for your corrections. I can't believe the internet has got it so wrong. :)

Re: Clothes hangers

Posted: Thu Feb 14, 2019 4:26 pm
by Shelley
I'm shocked. Shocked.

Re: Clothes hangers

Posted: Thu Feb 14, 2019 7:40 pm
by trolley
In "Canlish", those sleeveless shirts are called "singlets" (if worn as an undershirt). Tank-tops usually would refer to a a women's sleeveless shirt and, if worn by a man they'd be called muscle shirts. Gumboots (or gumbies) is pretty common here. When I was younger, any rubber foot wear were called galoshes (not just the slip on over-shoes). Garters are single bands worn on arms or legs designed to hold up sleeves or stockings. Garter belts were worn around women's waists and had some sort of alligator clips to hold up their stockings (before panty hose came along). Suspenders are used to hold up your pants... what the British would call braces. You rarely hear "tennis shoes" up hear. They are often called sneakers, but more commonly, are called runners or running shoes. The term "cross-trainers" has gained quite a bit of traction in the last few years. I'm with Shelley, that last one is certainly not a pair of boxers...not quite sure what they are. If they are undergarments, then I'd say they were bikini briefs (for men or women). If it's a man's swim suit then they are "Speedos"....WoZ might call them budgie smugglers.

Re: Clothes hangers

Posted: Sat Feb 16, 2019 2:19 am
by BonnieL
tony h wrote:
Sun Feb 10, 2019 5:35 pm
Shelley wrote:
Sat Feb 09, 2019 9:20 pm
Pants hangers usually have an extra bar along the bottom which the folded pants hang on, and there's a notch the bar tucks into that keeps the pants from slipping.
It would never occur to me to hang pants on a hanger. As far as I am aware the common expectation is that they would be kept in drawers.

:)
If they were slacks & you had to iron them, or at least keep them from getting creased, you'd put them on a hanger. I have the kind of hanger that has a single bar. It also works well for scarves & shawls.

Re: Clothes hangers

Posted: Sat Feb 16, 2019 12:42 pm
by tony h
BonnieL wrote:
Sat Feb 16, 2019 2:19 am
tony h wrote:
Sun Feb 10, 2019 5:35 pm
Shelley wrote:
Sat Feb 09, 2019 9:20 pm
Pants hangers usually have an extra bar along the bottom which the folded pants hang on, and there's a notch the bar tucks into that keeps the pants from slipping.
It would never occur to me to hang pants on a hanger. As far as I am aware the common expectation is that they would be kept in drawers.

:)
If they were slacks & you had to iron them, or at least keep them from getting creased, you'd put them on a hanger. I have the kind of hanger that has a single bar. It also works well for scarves & shawls.
I wonder if you have missed the humour in that in the UK "pants" are undergarments. I would hang trousers on hangers. Slacks are a type of trouser worn by women. :)