Manners

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Manners

Post by Stevenloan » Sat Jan 12, 2019 9:36 am

"Cabin crew is primarily there for passenger safety, points out Hobica. Shifting that focus could lead to mixed messages and strain the passenger-crew relationship, he says. Hobica recalls one incident in first class on one major carrier where a passenger rudely demanded a flight attendant’s attention. “When [the passenger] wanted a refill of his cocktail he bellowed to a passing flight attendant, ‘More ice!,’” Hobica says. “The flight attendant said, ‘Sir, what’s the magic word?’ And he replied: ‘Don’t teach me manners just give me more ice.’

Hi everyone! Is "Do not teach me how to behave well" considered a great substitution of "Don't teach me manners" in this situation?

Thanks so much!

StevenLoan
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Re: Manners

Post by Rufus Miles » Sat Jan 12, 2019 9:42 am

The whole extract presents the passenger's personality in a certain light. Of the various possible descriptions, "impatient" springs to mind. This leads me to think the passenger would have preferred the shorter formulation, although an expletive would have lengthened it again.
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Re: Manners

Post by tony h » Sat Jan 12, 2019 9:38 pm

Don't teach me manners or better still don't you go teaching me manners work well.
The phrase Do not teach me how to behave well is just too cumbersome. Less so if you remove the "well".


A much less aggressive form used to be, maybe from an Aunt to a Nephew: "have you been visiting the Duke of Rutland?" or "you need a visit to the Duke of Rutland". This refers
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Re: Manners

Post by trolley » Sat Jan 12, 2019 11:11 pm

I had to go and look that up. I thought maybe you had gone for a nap and were going to finish the thought later. I was too curious to wait. :shock:
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Re: Manners

Post by Stevenloan » Sun Jan 13, 2019 2:49 pm

Rufus Miles, tony h and trolley : Thank you all so much for your answers.

StevenLoan
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Re: Manners

Post by tony h » Sun Jan 13, 2019 4:38 pm

trolley wrote:
Sat Jan 12, 2019 11:11 pm
I had to go and look that up. I thought maybe you had gone for a nap and were going to finish the thought later. I was too curious to wait. :shock:

Ah I am not quite sure what happened there. But now I need to ask : did you find out ? It is, of course, a reference to the family name "Manners" of the Dukes, and Earls, of Rutland since 1525. I think I got distracted on a discussion of Plantagenet history as the first founding was to a Plantagenet. A grandson of Edward III (who appears on my wife's family tree and so gives her a direct line to God). :)
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Re: Manners

Post by trolley » Mon Jan 14, 2019 12:31 am

I did, Tony. Thanks. Interesting that those two sayings seem to be saying two different things. "Have you been visiting....(and picking up all their bad habits)" and "Do you need a visit...(for a refresher on good manners)".
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Re: Manners

Post by tony h » Mon Jan 14, 2019 11:04 am

trolley wrote:
Mon Jan 14, 2019 12:31 am
I did, Tony. Thanks. Interesting that those two sayings seem to be saying two different things. "Have you been visiting....(and picking up all their bad habits)" and "Do you need a visit...(for a refresher on good manners)".
I should have made it clear "have you been visiting the Duke of Rutland" was a compliment on good behaviour.
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