consorting in government departments

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consorting in government departments

Post by tony h » Wed Feb 21, 2018 12:04 pm

Today I received a letter from that beloved of all government agencies HMRC. In it the lady says "I have consorted with one of my colleagues and have cancelled ...". Now my immediate reaction to this was to understand:
1. she had rumpy pumpy with her colleague to gain a cancellation of ... (I thought this was going a bit far for my benefit).
2. she had rumpy pumpy with her colleague and was feeling in a good mood and so cancelled ...
3. she meant "consulted with a colleague".

4. can "consorted with" be a correct expression to use in this context, assuming appropriate conduct between members of staff?
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Signature: tony

I'm puzzled therefore I think.

Re: consorting in government departments

Post by Erik_Kowal » Wed Feb 21, 2018 2:50 pm

Not really. If we take the most applicable definition of the verb 'consort (with)' supplied by oxforddictionaries.com,

Habitually associate with (someone), typically with the disapproval of others.
‘you chose to consort with the enemy’

then your tax official's involvement with her colleague is irrelevant at best; otherwise, it potentially ranges from suspicious to salacious.
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Re: consorting in government departments

Post by BonnieL » Wed Feb 21, 2018 5:23 pm

Do you think she meant consulted? I read something yesterday where the author used the word "invaluable" when he meant the opposite.
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Re: consorting in government departments

Post by Bobinwales » Sat Feb 24, 2018 12:35 am

I reckon that if she really was consorting with a colleague (thank got it wasn't "co-worker"),
that you can safely tell her to rumpy-pumpy off!
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Signature: All those years gone to waist!
Bob in Wales

End of topic.
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