A kind of vegetable

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A kind of vegetable

Post by Stevenloan » Mon Sep 04, 2017 8:02 am

Hi you guys! What do you call this kind of vegetable? Is it commonly eaten where you live? It's very commonly eaten where I live.

http://www.thaihuot.com/uploads/images/ ... le/v37.jpg

Thanks so much!

StevenLoan
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Re: A kind of vegetable

Post by Phil White » Mon Sep 04, 2017 10:50 am

It seems to be called "bitter melon".
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Signature: Phil White
Non sum felix lepus

Re: A kind of vegetable

Post by Erik_Kowal » Mon Sep 04, 2017 11:21 am

According to Wikipedia:

Momordica charantia, known as bitter melon, bitter gourd, bitter squash, or balsam-pear, is a tropical and subtropical vine of the family Cucurbitaceae, widely grown in Asia, Africa, and the Caribbean for its edible fruit. Its many varieties differ substantially in the shape and bitterness of the fruit. Bitter melon also has names in other languages which have entered English as loanwords, e.g. kǔguā (苦瓜) from Chinese, nigauri (苦瓜) from Japanese, gōyā (ゴーヤー) from Okinawan, kaipakka (കിയാപാക്ക്ക) in Malayalam, kakarakaya (కాకరకాయ) in Telugu, Hāgala (ಹಾಗಲ) in Kannada, pākal (பாகல்) in Tamil and karela (करेला and كاريلا) or kareli (करेली and کریلی) in Hindustani (Hindi and Urdu), coming from Sanskrit. In Bengali, it is known as uchche (উচ্ছে). Those from the Caribbean island of Jamaica commonly refer to the plant as cerasee. In Brazil this plant is called Saint Cajetan's Melon (melão-de-são-caetano). In Guyana the plant is referred to as corilla. In the Philippines it is called ampalaya or amargoso.

Bitter melon originated in India and was introduced into China in the 14th century. It is widely used in East Asian, South Asian, and Southeast Asian cuisine.
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Re: A kind of vegetable

Post by tony h » Mon Sep 04, 2017 10:50 pm

Erik, very impressive.

And no, it isn't eaten often in the UK. It isn't generally available in shops here.
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With the right context almost anything can sound appropriate.

Re: A kind of vegetable

Post by Stevenloan » Tue Sep 05, 2017 12:40 pm

I would like to thank you all very very much for the term.
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End of topic.
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