An operation

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An operation

Post by Stevenloan » Wed Aug 16, 2017 4:17 pm

Hi you guys! How do I say to describe a situation when a woman has an operation to deliver a baby? Is it correct to say "She delivers her baby by having an operation"?

Thanks a lot!

StevenLoan
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Re: An operation

Post by Phil White » Wed Aug 16, 2017 5:31 pm

There are many different ways in which midwives or obstetricians (a doctor who specializes in caring for women during pregnancy and childbirth) can intervene in childbirth. Any actual surgical intervention would generally be performed by an obstetrician.

Generally, all intervention that goes beyond the normal difficulties of childbirth would be called an "assisted delivery". If a baby is delivered with assistance, we would usually refer to the name of the actual procedure used, such as a "forceps delivery" or a "Caesarian section".

My guess is that you are thinking of a Caesarian section, and we would normally say something like the following, where "Pam" is the mother and "Sally" is the baby.

"Sally was delivered by Caesarian section."
"Pam had a Caesarian section."
"Pam had/needed a Caesarian."
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Re: An operation

Post by trolley » Wed Aug 16, 2017 5:56 pm

More often than not, in North America it would be called a "C-section", rather than its proper name.
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Re: An operation

Post by tony h » Wed Aug 16, 2017 9:53 pm

I make the note that giving birth in hospital is the norm in the UK. Before then people would also comment on "she had a hospital birth". Now the comment would be the obverse "she had a home birth" - of which a practice that now, apparently, the Royal College of Midwives is disapproving.
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With the right context almost anything can sound appropriate.

Re: An operation

Post by Erik_Kowal » Thu Aug 17, 2017 2:13 am

Colloquially, if the child was delivered by C-section (optional words enclosed in square brackets): "They [had to] cut her open [to deliver the baby]".
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Re: An operation

Post by Stevenloan » Thu Aug 17, 2017 3:35 pm

Thank you all very very much
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Re: An operation

Post by BonnieL » Thu Aug 17, 2017 4:54 pm

trolley wrote:
Wed Aug 16, 2017 5:56 pm
More often than not, in North America it would be called a "C-section", rather than its proper name.
Yep. "She had a C-section." And that would be it, except for birthing horror stories by others. :roll:
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Re: An operation

Post by Phil White » Thu Aug 17, 2017 5:36 pm

I find this all most bizarre. This is C section.
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Re: An operation

Post by Erik_Kowal » Thu Aug 17, 2017 7:11 pm

Not bizarre at all. In the USA and wherever else 'C-section' is used in connection with delivering a baby, it's simply a shortened form of 'Caesarian section'.
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Re: An operation

Post by Phil White » Thu Aug 17, 2017 7:33 pm

Ah! 4 syllables. Could be tricky.

I always find "marmalade" an obscenely long word for first thing in the morning.
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Re: An operation

Post by tony h » Thu Aug 17, 2017 10:06 pm

Phil White wrote:
Thu Aug 17, 2017 7:33 pm

I always find "marmalade" an obscenely long word for first thing in the morning.


but most necessary.
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With the right context almost anything can sound appropriate.

Re: An operation

Post by Erik_Kowal » Fri Aug 18, 2017 1:09 am

Phil White wrote:
Thu Aug 17, 2017 7:33 pm
I always find "marmalade" an obscenely long word for first thing in the morning.
I suppose you'd prefer just to get 'lade?
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Re: An operation

Post by Wizard of Oz » Thu Aug 24, 2017 4:20 am

As the wee chick remarked, "Marmalade an egg."

WoZ with the Legions
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Signature: "The question is," said Alice, "whether you can make words mean so many different things."

End of topic.
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