Green notes

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Green notes

Post by Stevenloan » Mon Jul 24, 2017 6:08 am

"In a woman's world, 'she' wants to look great and outstanding, therefore a woman would do anything to get herself the most exquisite fashion accessories to look stunningly beautiful and gorgeous. They say that the brands you wear really shows how expensive you are and also what style statement you can bring about for any other girl to follow. If you have the green notes, go ahead and treat yourself today!"

Hi you guys! What does "green notes" mean in this short paragraph? I couldn't find its meaning online.

Thanks very much!

StevenLoan
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Re: Green notes

Post by Erik_Kowal » Mon Jul 24, 2017 12:48 pm

I suspect that 'green notes' is being used to mean simply 'money'. The author who ejected this repulsively materialistic and superficial (not to say superfluous)
article, which dates from 2011, is an Indian woman. At that time, the 500-rupee note was green.

Ideally, we would have confirmation from someone who is familiar with Indian society to verify my guess about the connotations of the term.
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Re: Green notes

Post by tony h » Mon Jul 24, 2017 6:47 pm

Erik_Kowal wrote:I suspect that 'green notes' is being used to mean simply 'money'. The author who ejected this repulsively materialistic and superficial (not to say superfluous)
article, which dates from 2011, is an Indian woman. At that time, the 500-rupee note was green.

Ideally, we would have confirmation from someone who is familiar with Indian society to verify my guess about the connotations of the term.
This might be a mutilated reference to greenbacks (being US dollars) or possibly (depending on the date) the rumoured 1000 rupee note. Although I had thought the Indian government was getting rid of high value notes to encourage more (traceable) bank transactions.

My suspicion is that it is USD as you regularly get asked in high class outlets in India whether you are paying in USD. There is much appreciation of folding dollars and access to different products.
Last edited by tony h on Tue Jul 25, 2017 9:06 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Signature: tony

With the right context almost anything can sound appropriate.

Re: Green notes

Post by Erik_Kowal » Mon Jul 24, 2017 7:20 pm

It's certainly possible that the author was thinking in terms of American dollar bills, all denominations of which are all predominantly green.

A native-born American citizen would be rather unlikely to speak of 'notes' when talking about their own country's currency (= 'X dollar bills', where X stands for the value), but a speaker of Indian English might either be unaware of this difference or not consider it to be important.

A question for you, Tony: Have you been asked in any British 'high-class outlets' whether you are intending to pay in USD? (I'm not likely to enter that kind of store, so that's why I'm asking.) I've only been asked this question in Central America and in states of the former Soviet Union, but not anywhere in Europe.

Incidentally, it was in 2016 that the Indian government demonetized the INR ('₹') 500 and 1000 notes; the successor INR 500 note is green as well. According to Wikipedia:
A newly redesigned series of ₹500 banknote, in addition to a new denomination of ₹2000 banknote is in circulation since 10 November 2016. The new redesigned series is also expected to be enlarged with banknotes in the denominations of ₹1000, ₹100 and ₹50 in the coming months.
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Re: Green notes

Post by Bobinwales » Mon Jul 24, 2017 7:44 pm

The last UK Pound note was green as well.

Doesn't the Queen look young?
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Signature: All those years gone to waist!
Bob in Wales

Re: Green notes

Post by trolley » Mon Jul 24, 2017 11:51 pm

As usual, something on here sent me wandering down some other trail and I started thinking about how the Queen's portrait, on Canadian money has aged over the years. Here's an interesting bit on how she has been portrayed on various Commonweath currencies http://mentalfloss.com/article/52759/15 ... ng-process. Some striking differences...and not just in how her age is presented. I've never seen her as she is shown in number 4, that five rupee from Mauritius. She looks damned cranky in that Aussie dollar at number six.
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Re: Green notes

Post by Stevenloan » Tue Jul 25, 2017 4:17 pm

Thank you all very very much for the input. I really appreciate it.
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Re: Green notes

Post by tony h » Tue Jul 25, 2017 9:16 pm

@Erik_Kowal Thank you for your question. It has caused me to edit my post to say that the shops were in India.

And no. I haven't been asked the question in the UK. Although some shops in London used to (may still do so) accept transactions in various currencies. I suspect the use of plastic has rendered that obsolete.
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Signature: tony

With the right context almost anything can sound appropriate.

Re: Green notes

Post by Erik_Kowal » Tue Jul 25, 2017 10:24 pm

Tony, thanks for the clarification. ☺
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End of topic.
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