A fare

This is the place to post questions and discussions on usage and style. The members of the Wordwizard Clubhouse will also often be able to help you to formulate that difficult letter.
Post Reply

A fare

Post by Stevenloan » Fri Jul 14, 2017 4:57 pm

Hi you guys! A woman is running late for a job interview, she runs very fast trying to catch a cab but the cab doesn't stop. She's angry and says loudly "Hey! Wait! Stop! You don't even have a fare." Does "You don't even have a fare" in this situation mean "You don't want to pick up a customer to earn money"?

Thanks very much!

StevenLoan
Post actions:

Re: A fare

Post by trolley » Fri Jul 14, 2017 7:52 pm

In this case "a fare" means a paying customer. She is angry because the cab would not stop even though it did not already have someone on board.
Post actions:

Re: A fare

Post by Erik_Kowal » Sat Jul 15, 2017 1:43 am

Normally, a fare simply refers to the amount payable for being transported in some sort of vehicle: 'bus fare', 'train fare' etc. (but note that for some non-obvious reason, the cost of travelling by ship [especially on a long voyage] is usually called a passage: "How much was your passage to New York?")

Here, however, the cost of the transportation is being used to represent abstractly the person being conveyed.

Another example of this kind of elliptical usage is cover in the sense of a place setting at a table in a restaurant: "Our busiest time is in summer, when we have up to a thousand covers a day". In this case, cover is being used instead of 'diner' or 'customer'.
Post actions:

End of topic.
Post Reply