Closets

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Closets

Post by Stevenloan » Sun Jul 09, 2017 4:42 pm

Hi you guys! Does "skeleton-free closets" have a figurative meaning in this article? If yes, please let me know what it means. (The sentence below the first big picture of Ed Miliband)

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/men/thinking ... cians.html

Thanks so much!

StevenLoan
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Re: Closets

Post by Bobinwales » Sun Jul 09, 2017 9:36 pm

In America clothes and what have you are kept in closets. In the UK we keep them in cupboards, and when we have a secret that no-one must know about we have a "skeleton in the cupboard", but often we see the American version being used here. Indeed your link is to a British newspaper.
This phrase means that Ed Milliband had nothing to keep hidden.
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Signature: All those years gone to waist!
Bob in Wales

Re: Closets

Post by Erik_Kowal » Sun Jul 09, 2017 11:13 pm

Nor did he have much to show.
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Re: Closets

Post by tony h » Mon Jul 10, 2017 4:22 pm

Bobinwales wrote:In America clothes and what have you are kept in closets. In the UK we keep them in cupboards, and when we have a secret that no-one must know about we have a "skeleton in the cupboard", but often we see the American version being used here. Indeed your link is to a British newspaper.
This phrase means that Ed Milliband had nothing to keep hidden.
There is a sister phrase to this one being along the lines of "he knows where the bodies are". Naturally these bodies would be dead.

Both of these relate to severely compromising information.

To me the use of "bodies" suggests something relatively fresh (maybe only a few years old). Whereas the "skeletons" phrase suggests something a long time ago almost completely forgotten and not being looked for. The image being that the body had decomposed and there is only the skeleton left.
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Signature: tony

With the right context almost anything can sound appropriate.

Re: Closets

Post by Erik_Kowal » Mon Jul 10, 2017 9:04 pm

"He knows where the bodies are buried" is how you might describe a blackmailer.

In my mind, the reference to skeletons in the closet evokes the traditional association with haunted houses and ghost trains, as well as the accompanying element of suspense. A skeleton in the closet often comes as a complete surprise. Many a scandal in British politics has erupted because of an unexpected revelation about someone's misdeeds long ago, or their questionable dredged-up opinions or connections.
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Re: Closets

Post by Stevenloan » Tue Jul 11, 2017 9:30 am

Thank you all so much. I really appreciate it.
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End of topic.
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