Buck

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Buck

Post by Stevenloan » Tue Jul 04, 2017 3:06 pm

Hi everyone! "buck" has quite a few meanings in dictionaries. Could you please tell me what "the buck always stops with the mother" means in the following link? The fifth picture which has Prince William, Kate Middleton and two babies.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/prince-william/

Thanks a lot!

StevenLoan
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Re: Buck

Post by BonnieL » Tue Jul 04, 2017 4:02 pm

She's in charge. Our president Harry Truman was famous for the sign on his desk, "The buck stops here."
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Re: Buck

Post by Erik_Kowal » Tue Jul 04, 2017 5:46 pm

The meaning is explained by the context provided by the next sentence:

"It doesn't matter how many nannies you have, the buck always stops with you, remarked one billionaire mother to me a few years back. Just because you are rich and have a nanny, doesn’t mean that you can defer all care of your infant to a member of staff".

In other words, the parents still have the overall responsibility for their child's welfare.
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Re: Buck

Post by tony h » Tue Jul 04, 2017 8:03 pm

Phrases which start "the buck stops .." means "responsibility ends with ...". This is, in my experience, most commonly used by a person stating "the buck stops with me". This is the antithesis of a person saying "it isn't my decision to make you will need to speak to the manager".

So as Erik says the article is saying a wealthy mother cannot just stop being responsible for her children by employing nannies. In the end the mother is responsible.

P.S. I have no idea why it is a "buck" that stops.
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Signature: tony

With the right context almost anything can sound appropriate.

Re: Buck

Post by Bobinwales » Tue Jul 04, 2017 8:09 pm

Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge has not used the name Middleton since 29 April 2011 when she married, although the Press seem to be completely oblivious of the fact. If she were to use a surname at all, she would be 'Wales'.

My situation rings similar bells. I married my wife in December last year, and she took the name Margaret Williams. She too had been a Middleton! Not the same family and bank account unfortunately!
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Signature: All those years gone to waist!
Bob in Wales

Re: Buck

Post by Bobinwales » Tue Jul 04, 2017 8:12 pm

You might like to consider this,
.
"The expression is said to have originated from poker, in which a marker or counter (such as a knife with a buckhorn handle during the American Frontier era) was used to indicate the person whose turn it was to deal. If the player did not wish to deal he could pass the responsibility by passing the "buck", as the counter came to be called, to the next player.

Another less common but arguably less fanciful attribution is to the French expression bouc émissaire, meaning "scapegoat", whereby passing the bouc is equivalent to passing the blame or onus. The terms bouc émissaire and scapegoat both originate from an Old Testament (Lev. 16:6–10) reference to an animal that was ritually made to carry the burden of sins, after which the "buck" was sent or "passed" into the wilderness to expiate them.".
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Signature: All those years gone to waist!
Bob in Wales

Re: Buck

Post by Stevenloan » Wed Jul 05, 2017 8:07 am

Thank you all very very much. I really appreciate your help.
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End of topic.
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