new tricks

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new tricks

Post by navi » Thu Jun 08, 2017 9:32 am

Which are correct:

1) I gave him my dog for a few days to teach it new tricks.


2) I gave him my dog for a few days to learn new tricks from him.

3) I gave him my dog for a few days to learn new tricks.

He was supposed to teach the dog new tricks. The dog was supposed to learn new tricks.

Gratefully,
Navi.
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Re: new tricks

Post by Erik_Kowal » Thu Jun 08, 2017 5:28 pm

1) doesn't mean what you want it to mean. It implies that you gave 'him' the dog in order to teach it new tricks yourself.

2) and 3) both suggest that you gave 'him' your dog so that you could learn some new tricks.

The way I'd have phrased it is "I gave him my dog for a few days so [that] he could teach it some new tricks".
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Re: new tricks

Post by tony h » Fri Jun 09, 2017 2:24 pm

On their own the sentences could mean exactly what you want or have the exact confusion that Erik sees. Context, as we always say is everything.

So to give some context:

"my little pup is such a sweet thing but I have got nowhere trying to teach her tricks. Anyway Simon's friend William is a dogtrainer and he said he could teach her tricks no problem. "
1) I gave him my dog for a few days to teach it new tricks.
2) I gave him my dog for a few days to learn new tricks from him.
3) I gave him my dog for a few days to learn new tricks.


"Now look at her. She can play ball, beg and play dead."


I think all can work.
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Signature: tony

With the right context almost anything can sound appropriate.

End of topic.
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