The fun

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The fun

Post by Stevenloan » Sat May 20, 2017 5:04 pm

Hi you guys! I am at my friend's birthday party. A girl volunteers to sing a song and when she finishes her song, I want to keep the fun atmosphere going, so can I say it like this in this case?

1. To keep the fun going, I want to sing another song.
2. To keep the merriment going, I want to sing another song.

Thanks so much!

StevenLoan
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Re: The fun

Post by Erik_Kowal » Sat May 20, 2017 9:26 pm

Those sentences work grammatically, but to actually say them would be rather crass and heavy-handed, at least in Britain and the US.

In real life, to keep the fun going I think most people would not ponderously signal their intention in this way. They'd just get up and sing.
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Re: The fun

Post by Stevenloan » Sun May 21, 2017 2:56 pm

Erik: Thank you for your post.
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Re: The fun

Post by BonnieL » Sun May 21, 2017 5:40 pm

Erik_Kowal wrote:In real life, to keep the fun going I think most people would not ponderously signal their intention in this way. They'd just get up and sing.
That brought up a wonderful memory of an uncle who, at a family camp out, did a solo of "Mairzy Doats." He was the only one who could remember all the words. :D
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Re: The fun

Post by Phil White » Sun May 21, 2017 9:07 pm

BonnieL wrote:That brought up a wonderful memory of an uncle who, at a family camp out, did a solo of "Mairzy Doats." He was the only one who could remember all the words. :D
Which reminded me of a classic piece of graffiti from many, many years ago:

Underneath the sign "Mersey Docks and Harbour Board", someone had painted "and little lambs eat ivy".
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Signature: Phil White
Non sum felix lepus

Re: The fun

Post by tony h » Sat May 27, 2017 8:50 pm

Erik_Kowal wrote:In real life, to keep the fun going I think most people would not ponderously signal their intention in this way. They'd just get up and sing.
If you were going to say something you might say "how about another song?" or "another song anyone".

I think there is some cultural difference here. Most people here would be rather self conscious singing. This wasn't always the case, and still isn't amongst some groups (rugby players, the Welsh, Germans and folk singing groups) or families. What I have noticed in some of my travels in foreign lands is that in some countries welcomed visitors are put in the position of being expected to perform a song for their hosts.
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Signature: tony

With the right context almost anything can sound appropriate.

End of topic.
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