at his office

This is the place to post questions and discussions on usage and style. The members of the Wordwizard Clubhouse will also often be able to help you to formulate that difficult letter.
Post Reply

at his office

Post by navi » Tue May 09, 2017 9:59 am

1) I gave him a call at his office.
2) I called him at his office.

3) I sent him a message at his office.
4) I sent a message to him at his office.

In which case I am in his office (maybe he has gone somewhere else)?
In which case he is at his office?

Gratefully,
Navi.
Post actions:

Re: at his office

Post by Bobinwales » Tue May 09, 2017 2:27 pm

If you were in his office and he wasn't, you would have left a message.
Post actions:
Signature: All those years gone to waist!
Bob in Wales

Re: at his office

Post by BonnieL » Tue May 09, 2017 6:43 pm

2 - I called on him at his office.

Rather old fashioned & to call now usually means on a phone. Why not "I went to his office" or "I met him at his office."
Post actions:

Re: at his office

Post by navi » Tue May 09, 2017 9:35 pm

Thank you both very much,

I did mean I called him on the phone.

As for the other meaning, here is a possible scenario:
I went there. He wasn't there. From his office, I called him on his cell.

Gratefully,
Navi.
Post actions:

Re: at his office

Post by Bobinwales » Tue May 09, 2017 10:24 pm

You need to remember that in the UK, where the mobile telephone was actually invented, a "cell" is where you sit when you are in gaol (jail).
Post actions:
Signature: All those years gone to waist!
Bob in Wales

Re: at his office

Post by Phil White » Wed May 10, 2017 9:44 pm

In all cases, I would assume that I was not in his office, as this is the normal and expected scenario. If the scenario is unexpected, namely that I am at his office and he is not, I would need to give that information somewhere else in the discourse for any of the sentences to be understood in that way.
Post actions:
Signature: Phil White
Non sum felix lepus

End of topic.
Post Reply