Toilet paper

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Toilet paper

Post by Stevenloan » Sat Apr 22, 2017 5:18 pm

Husband: Honey! There’s no toilet paper.
Wife: Oh oh.
Husband: Would you get a roll for me, please?
Wife: Papa make a poopie?
Husband: Yes, I made a poopie.
Wife: Did Daddy do a doo-doo?
Husband: Just get the toilet paper, please.
Wife: All right, well, you sit tight. I’m gonna go find you some TP.

Hi you guys! Do you and people where you live usually use "TP" as a lazy and shorter version for "toilet paper" in spoken English?

Thanks so much!

StevenLoan
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Re: Toilet paper

Post by tony h » Sun Apr 23, 2017 2:34 pm

No.

After the first three lines the words are, what I would describe as, baby-talk.
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With the right context almost anything can sound appropriate.

Re: Toilet paper

Post by BonnieL » Sun Apr 23, 2017 3:04 pm

Yes. People call it tp (no caps needed), but ads tend to call it bathroom tissue or something like that. No tv so haven't noticed if they're still doing that.
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Re: Toilet paper

Post by Erik_Kowal » Sun Apr 23, 2017 6:18 pm

'TP' (or 'tp') would be generally understood in the United States, but not in Britain.

To digress a bit, the same is true of another everyday American abbreviation, namely OJ for orange juice.
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Re: Toilet paper

Post by trolley » Sun Apr 23, 2017 7:12 pm

A cruder term is "shit tickets"...but you should know your audience before you use that one.
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Re: Toilet paper

Post by BonnieL » Sun Apr 23, 2017 10:11 pm

Erik_Kowal wrote:'TP' (or 'tp') would be generally understood in the United States, but not in Britain.

To digress a bit, the same is true of another everyday American abbreviation, namely OJ for orange juice.
Do you have BLT (bacon, lettuce & tomato) & PB&J (peanut butter & jelly) in Britain?
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Re: Toilet paper

Post by tony h » Sun Apr 23, 2017 11:09 pm

BonnieL wrote:
Erik_Kowal wrote:'TP' (or 'tp') would be generally understood in the United States, but not in Britain.

To digress a bit, the same is true of another everyday American abbreviation, namely OJ for orange juice.
Do you have BLT (bacon, lettuce & tomato) & PB&J (peanut butter & jelly) in Britain?
BLTs are generally available. PB&J, not as an abbreviation, is known as one of those weird American things. Like the French with snails. Oh, and gosh this is so funny, Americans call jam jelly! They surely are strange.
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Signature: tony

With the right context almost anything can sound appropriate.

Re: Toilet paper

Post by Bobinwales » Sun Apr 23, 2017 11:30 pm

gosh this is so funny, Americans call jam jelly
And Germans call it marmalade, there is no sense in it all. :D
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Signature: All those years gone to waist!
Bob in Wales

Re: Toilet paper

Post by Stevenloan » Mon Apr 24, 2017 5:50 am

Thank you all very much
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Re: Toilet paper

Post by BonnieL » Mon Apr 24, 2017 3:35 pm

tony h wrote: Oh, and gosh this is so funny, Americans call jam jelly! They surely are strange.
That's one of things that can cause misunderstandings. Another is the biscuit/cookie thing. I remember reading about a boy visiting Britain with his mother; he'd been saying 'no thank you' to offers of biscuits & it wasn't until the end of his visit that he found out he'd been turning down cookies.
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Re: Toilet paper

Post by Bobinwales » Mon Apr 24, 2017 11:18 pm

I once told a young American girl who was staying with us that as she wanted to be away early in the morning that I would knock her up before I went to work. She was a little worried...
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Signature: All those years gone to waist!
Bob in Wales

Re: Toilet paper

Post by tony h » Tue Apr 25, 2017 9:12 am

My wife once answered the telephone to an American lady, she described the voice as sultry American. The lady said "Hello Mrs. H. I just wanted to let you know your husband left his pants at my apartment. I'll send them on."

Dinner that night was a rather frosty affair - I suspect that affair is the wrong word. I did explain that this wasn't the remnant of an indiscretion or an over exuberant corporate event (as I am sure she knew), that in American pants are trousers, the apartment is the hotel room, and I guessed that the use of "my" indicated that she was the manager. I now check carefully that I have received everything back from the laundry before finishing packing.

It took some while before a thaw.
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With the right context almost anything can sound appropriate.

Re: Toilet paper

Post by Bobinwales » Tue Apr 25, 2017 4:29 pm

Dodgy one that Tony. The same lady that I offered to knock up told us that putting the "covers on the water bed was like patting a huge fanny". I managed to explain why it was not wise to use that analogy in the UK.
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Signature: All those years gone to waist!
Bob in Wales

End of topic.
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