Upper floor

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Upper floor

Post by Stevenloan » Tue Feb 07, 2017 2:35 pm

Hi you guys! What do you call the upper floor next to the ladder (there is a white mattress and a red blanket)?

http://land24.vn/gac-xep-tang-dien-tich ... ng-tin5532

Thanks a lot!

StevenLoan
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Re: Upper floor

Post by tony h » Tue Feb 07, 2017 2:56 pm

Mezzanine.

Although I suspect the first picture is not, as I understand it, a true mezzanine the others are.
The other option is to call the first one is a split-level room and it is the upper level. But normally a split-level room would only be one or two steps up or down.

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With the right context almost anything can sound appropriate.

Re: Upper floor

Post by Erik_Kowal » Tue Feb 07, 2017 3:04 pm

All the photos depict variations of a mezzanine, which may be defined as an intermediate floor in a building that is open to the floor below.

Each of the top two set-ups could be specified further as a sleeping nook or sleeping platform.
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Re: Upper floor

Post by tony h » Tue Feb 07, 2017 3:49 pm

Erik_Kowal wrote:All the photos depict variations of a mezzanine, which may be defined as an intermediate floor in a building that is open to the floor below.

Each of the top two set-ups could be specified further as a sleeping nook or sleeping platform.
Are you absolutely sure about the first? Not a specialist subject of mine. As I understand it a mezzanine (including its supports, can be removed from a building without affecting its structural integrity. It is by no means clear to me that this can be done with the first.
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With the right context almost anything can sound appropriate.

Re: Upper floor

Post by trolley » Tue Feb 07, 2017 5:21 pm

Although it may stretch the traditional definition of the word, those are called "lofts" around here.
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Re: Upper floor

Post by BonnieL » Tue Feb 07, 2017 7:05 pm

trolley wrote:Although it may stretch the traditional definition of the word, those are called "lofts" around here.
Same here. The really tiny ones would usually be called sleeping lofts. Tho when we were househunting I saw one the seller (or agent) called a reading nook.
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Re: Upper floor

Post by Erik_Kowal » Thu Feb 09, 2017 2:36 am

tony h wrote:
Erik_Kowal wrote:All the photos depict variations of a mezzanine, which may be defined as an intermediate floor in a building that is open to the floor below.

Each of the top two set-ups could be specified further as a sleeping nook or sleeping platform.
Are you absolutely sure about the first? Not a specialist subject of mine. As I understand it a mezzanine (including its supports, can be removed from a building without affecting its structural integrity. It is by no means clear to me that this can be done with the first.
I checked the entries I found at the Onelook.com metadictionary, but not one of them mentioned your additional definitional criterion.
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Re: Upper floor

Post by Stevenloan » Thu Feb 09, 2017 4:33 am

Thank you guys very very much.
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Re: Upper floor

Post by tony h » Sat Feb 11, 2017 10:40 pm

Erik_Kowal wrote:
tony h wrote:
Erik_Kowal wrote:All the photos depict variations of a mezzanine, which may be defined as an intermediate floor in a building that is open to the floor below.

Each of the top two set-ups could be specified further as a sleeping nook or sleeping platform.
Are you absolutely sure about the first? Not a specialist subject of mine. As I understand it a mezzanine (including its supports, can be removed from a building without affecting its structural integrity. It is by no means clear to me that this can be done with the first.
I checked the entries I found at the Onelook.com metadictionary, but not one of them mentioned your additional definitional criterion.
Erik: it looks like my definition is rather old hat. I asked a friend who heads up a large architectural practice in Sydney and he gave me this:

"My definition is a split level (generally used for an ancillary purpose to the main use) however can be integral or supplemental. Mezzanines can be enclosed and aren't necessarily open to a larger area below but they are in my experience mostly open and generally smaller than the primary area."
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End of topic.
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