Carton

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Carton

Post by Stevenloan » Sun Jan 22, 2017 4:52 pm

Hi you guys! What does "He drinks out of the f***ing carton" mean in this situation?

"During an Instagram clip, Oliver Hudson teased that it's been hard seeing his movie star sibling date Brad Pitt. The Rules of Engagement actor started: ' He drinks out of the f***ing carton and he leaves the door open when he’s taking a dump ' ".

Thanks so much!

StevenLoan
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Re: Carton

Post by Erik_Kowal » Sun Jan 22, 2017 5:02 pm

That quote has been bowdlerized. In its unexpurgated form, it would read:
"During an Instagram clip, Oliver Hudson teased that it's been hard seeing his movie star sibling date Brad Pitt. The Rules of Engagement actor started: 'He drinks out of the fucking carton and he leaves the door open when he’s taking a dump ' ".
In effect, Hudson is alleging that Pitt's behaviour in his private life is crude and unappealing to others because (I infer) he doesn't respect some of the niceties of social conduct.

To answer your specific question, 'carton' refers to a carton containing milk or juice, and 'fucking' in this context is a crude intensifying adjective. (Humorously ironic, don't you think, considering what Hudson is complaining about?)
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Re: Carton

Post by tony h » Sun Jan 22, 2017 8:14 pm

Recasting Erik response.

Drinking from the carton is not a polite think to do. The expectation is, in polite society, that you pour from the carton into a cup or glass and drink from that.

"He drinks from the carton" can be read as a statement of fact with little to say whether this person finds that acceptable or not.
There are various ways to show the activity is unacceptable (to various levels of intensity) here an intensifier is used before carton. Other intensifiers could be used including: damn carton, bloody carton, f*** carton.

I was just about to press send on this when I realised ...

The same words in a different context could just as easily be praise.

A. "He's just a posh bugger".
B. "I know he can trace his family back to the twelfth century, has a butler, owns a castle and three thousand acres but when he is working with us here he is just one of us. He dresses in jeans and T-shirt, gets his hands dirty and drinks from the f***ing carton for God's sake."

So the point here is that context determines whether the phrase is positive or negative :D Just because I can.
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Signature: tony

With the right context almost anything can sound appropriate.

Re: Carton

Post by Stevenloan » Tue Jan 24, 2017 1:06 am

Erik_Kowal and tony h: Thanks so much for your answers. They are very detailed and clear.
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End of topic.
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