What do you call this kind of truck?

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What do you call this kind of truck?

Post by Stevenloan » Mon Apr 11, 2016 9:21 am

Hello there! What do you guys call this kind of truck?

https://www.google.com/search?q=xe+ch%E ... 4JFeoaM%3A

Thanks very much!

StevenLoan
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Re: What do you call this kind of truck?

Post by Phil White » Mon Apr 11, 2016 11:28 am

That is a "concrete mixer truck" or usually just a "concrete mixer". In the UK we tend to call them "cement mixers" rather than "concrete mixers".

A rather technical phrase sometimes used in the trade is "in-transit mixer".

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Concrete_mixer
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Re: What do you call this kind of truck?

Post by Bobinwales » Mon Apr 11, 2016 2:21 pm

Steven, as a complete aside.

Some of us believe that the word "truck" meaning a large road vehicle is an American term, the British English word is LORRY, but we are losing the battle!
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Re: What do you call this kind of truck?

Post by BonnieL » Mon Apr 11, 2016 4:30 pm

Bobinwales wrote:Steven, as a complete aside.

Some of us believe that the word "truck" meaning a large road vehicle is an American term, the British English word is LORRY, but we are losing the battle!
Lorry is such a cute word! I always picture small trucks or WWII vintage trucks. :)

Here in my part of the US we would call that truck a cement mixer or a cement truck. Tho cement mixers can be be quite small and are not mounted on trucks, so if you wanted your hearer/reader to understand you mean the large kind, you would use cement truck.
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Re: What do you call this kind of truck?

Post by trolley » Mon Apr 11, 2016 8:02 pm

Bonnie, they may be cute but they're always driving on the wrong side of the road. Bloody dangerous!
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Re: What do you call this kind of truck?

Post by Phil White » Mon Apr 11, 2016 9:10 pm

Having spent 20+ years translating for the transport and road safety sector, I have been over this one again and again.

For pragmatic reasons, I always use "truck" in my translations because, no matter what flavour of English I am meant to be using, the target audience is always international, including non-native speakers of English. "Truck" is simply more accessible to more people.

But it is interesting to think back over my own usage. When I was a kid in the UK, they were all "lorries". Full stop. In those days, the overwhelming majority of what were, for licensing purposes, known as HGVs (heavy goods vehicles) were of the non-articulated type. HGV remains the usual term in English for legislative and licensing purposes, so a driver will have an "HGV license", for instance.

When articulated vehicles started to become common on British roads in the 1960s or so, they were referred to by ordinary people as "articulated lorries" ("artics") or "juggernauts". Increasingly, the big artics started to be called "trucks", and as the brief fad of citizens' band (CB) radio swept the country in the late 70s and 80s, many American terms crept into more common use.

In the early 80s, I worked in the timber trade and had a fair amount to do with the logistics side. It struck me that the drivers themselves referred to themselves as "lorry drivers" or "truck drivers" largely depending on their age. The term "trucker" never really took root in the UK, although you would hear it around that time. If asked to put their profession on a form, I strongly suspect that they would all have put "HGV driver".

To my knowledge, articulated trucks/lorries have always been officially known as "truck/trailer combinations" in the trade in the UK and the US, especially in the insurance business.

Unlike their American colleagues, British drivers do not refer to the truck and trailer together as a "rig".

The bit at the front that does all the work is generally known as a "tractor (unit)" in official documents, and I believe "tractor" is common in the trade in the US. UK drivers would usually call this the "unit".

As far as my experience is concerned, I have to fast-forward to 2008, when I returned to the UK after 25 years away. Now, I have the sense that the balance between "truck" and "lorry" is around even, with "lorry" being more common for non-articulated vehicles, and "truck" for articulated vehicles. There is also an age aspect. Older people tend to use "lorry", while younger people use "truck". The big exception here is that small children almost invariably use "lorry".

There have also always been exceptions. Certain construction vehicles that are more at home on building sites than on roads have always been called "trucks". Foremost of these is the "dumper truck", which can range in size from small to gargantuan. By analogy, I suspect that some people who would tend to use "lorry" for other vehicles, may well opt for "truck" in the case of a "cement mixer truck".

My own personal sense may well be clouded by many years of translation practice, but nowadays I share Bonnie's feeling that "lorry" sounds rather cutesy and childish.
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Re: What do you call this kind of truck?

Post by Shelley » Mon Apr 11, 2016 9:56 pm

One of the best songs ever written -- Cement Mixer, Put-Ti Put-Ti.
Enjoy, my friends!
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Re: What do you call this kind of truck?

Post by BonnieL » Tue Apr 12, 2016 1:10 am

trolley wrote:Bonnie, they may be cute but they're always driving on the wrong side of the road. Bloody dangerous!
I'd be very nervous in Britain! We're working our way thru the Midsomer Murders series & the first time I see a car on the "wrong" side of the road, it jolts me. Then I get sort of used to it.
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Re: What do you call this kind of truck?

Post by Stevenloan » Tue Apr 12, 2016 1:49 am

Thank you guys very very much.
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Re: What do you call this kind of truck?

Post by Phil White » Tue Apr 12, 2016 10:22 am

The government are thinking of introducing driving on the right. It will be phased in. It will start with the HGVs in 2020 and cars a year later.
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Re: What do you call this kind of truck?

Post by Bobinwales » Tue Apr 12, 2016 12:43 pm

Phil, in your longer piece you refer to an "HGV license". I assume that one of your dictionaries is set to USEnglish. It is 'licence' of course.
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Re: What do you call this kind of truck?

Post by Bobinwales » Tue Apr 12, 2016 12:46 pm

Bonnie, you get worried about seeing cars driving on our side of the road, I get worried about visiting my step-brother in Midsomer Norton. I never expect to get home in one piece!
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Re: What do you call this kind of truck?

Post by Phil White » Tue Apr 12, 2016 1:14 pm

Bobinwales wrote:Phil, in your longer piece you refer to an "HGV license". I assume that one of your dictionaries is set to USEnglish. It is 'licence' of course.
Caught with my knickers down!
90 % of my work requires US spelling, so all my spellcheckers are set to US and, to be honest, I often fail to notice which way I type things. My screen reader just reads it to me no matter how it is written.
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Re: What do you call this kind of truck?

Post by BonnieL » Tue Apr 12, 2016 5:42 pm

Bobinwales wrote:Bonnie, you get worried about seeing cars driving on our side of the road, I get worried about visiting my step-brother in Midsomer Norton. I never expect to get home in one piece!
There's a real Midsomer? Cool! :)

One of these days I'd like to visit England & go on old house tours. I practically drool over the lovely old cottages & shops. I'm assuming many of them are real, not sets. I would suppose those old houses have drawbacks, just as our log cabins do. We've lived in a log cabin for 16 years & are just now getting the larger log building turned into a modern home. I am so looking forward to a flush toilet! I used to say that using an outhouse in winter built character; I now say I have plenty of character. :D
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Re: What do you call this kind of truck?

Post by Bobinwales » Tue Apr 12, 2016 9:06 pm

When you do make it across the Pond Bonnie, try to visit Wales, Scotland and Ireland as well as England. You won't be disappointed. When WoZ and Rhonda made a very brief visit we met up and had a drink. The result was that when we visited Australia we stayed with them for a couple of days. Nice things happen in the World of the Wizards.
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