Sort out

This is the place to post questions and discussions on usage and style. The members of the Wordwizard Clubhouse will also often be able to help you to formulate that difficult letter.
Post Reply

Sort out

Post by Stevenloan » Wed Feb 04, 2015 12:40 pm

Neighbor A (hears the noise from Neighbor B’s house. Comes over and asks) : Are you working again?
Neighbor B: Nope.I’m just sorting some stuff out.
Neighbor A: All right. I’ll leave you be then. Sleep well!
Neighbor B: Good night!

- Hi you guys! Does "sort some stuff out" in this context mean "resolve or solve a problem"? By the way, I don't understand the meaning of "I'll leave you be then". I checked its meaning online and the result was "I'll leave you to it". What does "I'll leave you be then" mean in this situation?

Thank you guys so much,

StevenLoan
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS

Re: Sort out

Post by Bobinwales » Wed Feb 04, 2015 10:07 pm

"Sorting some stuff out" means that he is going through a mixed pile of stuff, some of which he wants to keep and some he wants to throw out. Perhaps he is sorting into several piles. Stuff to keep: Stuff to throw out with the rubbish: Stuff to recycle: Stuff to take to the charity shop.

"I'll leave you be then", means exactly what you got online. "I will go away and not bother you so that you can finish the job".
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS
Signature: All those years gone to waist!
Bob in Wales

Re: Sort out

Post by tony h » Wed Feb 04, 2015 11:42 pm

First I agree with the pre-scriptor ; Bob.
The less obvious inferences are:
1.B works from home and it is noisy work eg: blacksmith, carpenter, gigolo.
2. if the noise had been because of B's work A would have complained - maybe to the landlord or local council who may prohibit such noise at that time

But because B was just "sorting stuff" eg going through all the stuff (with the realised intent of throwing it out) that has piled up in the spare room (papers, books, bicycle, exercise equipment, lamps, camping equipment, bottles of undrinkable liquid received as presents, electronic things for which you have lost the power cables, power cables. box of keys, batteries and staplers and stuff brought home whilst coming back from the pub, old tins of paint - which, incidentally, come in plastic containers not tins - roller skates, university books and course work) and all this just so he has got somewhere for his parents to stay when they arrive tomorrow, so A decided not to complain but just to let him be.
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS
Signature: tony

I'm puzzled therefore I think.

Re: Sort out

Post by Bobinwales » Thu Feb 05, 2015 10:13 am

I supose living next door to a gigolo could be quite interesting!

I should also say that Americans have "neighbors", the rest of us live next door to "neighbours".

@ @
. 0 ,
\__/
Last edited by Bobinwales on Thu Feb 05, 2015 9:22 pm, edited 1 time in total.
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS
Signature: All those years gone to waist!
Bob in Wales

Re: Sort out

Post by Stevenloan » Thu Feb 05, 2015 5:30 pm

Bobinwales: thank you very much. tony h: thanks for your post.
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS

Re: Sort out

Post by Edwin F Ashworth » Tue Feb 10, 2015 12:58 am

Yes, context argues against the metaphorical sense of 'sort out'.

'Leave someone be' is almost archaic now. It's almost a separable transitive multi-word verb of the verb + verb variety. 'Make do" is an intransitive V + V MWV, and 'let go' a separable transitive (or intransitive) V + V MWV. Perhaps 'leave John be' is a variant of 'let John be', but use of 'be' as a non-linking main verb is not common in any case. Perhaps it's a deletion of 'Let John be just the way he wants to be.'
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS

ACCESS_END_OF_TOPIC
Post Reply