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This is the place to post questions and discussions on usage and style. The members of the Wordwizard Clubhouse will also often be able to help you to formulate that difficult letter.
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Post by Stevenloan » Mon Jan 21, 2013 10:41 am

- I'm at a wedding party, I want to ask a girl next to me if she's a friend of the bride or groom. Could I say the sentences below in this case?

1. Are you from the bride or the groom?
2. Are you related to the bride or the groom?

Thanks a million,

StevenLoan
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Re: Related to

Post by trolley » Mon Jan 21, 2013 4:42 pm

When you speak of "things" being related, they are affiliated or associated. When people are related, they have a biological connection between them. They share a common ancestor (or the person you are married to shares a common ancestor with the other person). "From the bride or groom" is most definitely out. Your first choice sounds the most natural, to me. You might also say:
"Are you here for the bride or the groom?"
"Are you a guest of the bride or the groom?"
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Re: Related to

Post by Wizard of Oz » Wed Jan 23, 2013 5:04 am

.. Steve I have to disagree with trolley .. sentence 1. just does not make any sense to me in its current form .. you would need to add to that sentence >> you would need to make groom possesive (+ 's) and then add family/party ..

.. really the simplist way is to use >> Are you with the bride or groom? ..

.. sentence 2. would get you the information you need ..

WoZ loves receptions not weddings
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Signature: "The question is," said Alice, "whether you can make words mean so many different things."

Re: Related to

Post by trolley » Wed Jan 23, 2013 4:30 pm

Yes, I was a little unclear. When I said the first choice was most natural sounding, I meant the term "friend of the bride or groom" that Steve originally used.
.
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Re: Related to

Post by Shelley » Thu Jan 24, 2013 5:49 pm

Often, an usher at a wedding will approach a guest at the entrance to the hall and simply ask, "Bride or Groom?" The guest's answer tells the usher which side of the hall, relative to the altar/dais, they should be seated on, as in many traditions the groom's guests are on one side of the aisle, and the bride's guests are on the other.

So, it's really ok to say something like, "Are you from (or on) the groom's side?" It can relate either to which side of the room the guest is seated on, or which familial or friendship indentification the guest has. Also useful in declaring one's side in the inevitable marital clashes down the road!

I like WoZ's "Are you with the bride or the groom?"
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Re: Related to

Post by Edwin F Ashworth » Thu Jan 24, 2013 9:15 pm

I can imagine W C Fields answering: "No, I'm aginst 'em."
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Re: Related to

Post by Wizard of Oz » Thu Jan 24, 2013 11:51 pm

.. Shelley's answer reminded me of that wonderful song by the Irish Rovers, The Orange and The Green ..
Oh it is the biggest mix-up that you have ever seen
My father he was orange and my mother she was green

Oh my father was an Ulsterman, proud Protestant was he
My mother was a Catholic girl, from County Cork was she
They were married in two churches, lived happily enough
Until the day that I was born and things got rather tough
.. the other verses give a comic rendition of what is a very real problem with The Troubles ..

.. hopefully the worst is behind them ..

WoZ with no Christian marriage
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Signature: "The question is," said Alice, "whether you can make words mean so many different things."

End of topic.
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