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Entreated = Implored?

Posted: Mon Apr 18, 2011 4:22 pm
by Stevenloan
- Yesterday my uncle was pulled over for driving in the wrong lane. The 2 traffic police officers gave him a fine of $100 and decided to keep his car registration papers for 2 weeks. He (entreated / implored) them to let him go without a fine and not keep his car registration papers and he finally persuaded them.

- Are these sentences good enough to your native ears? :)

P.S: Here in my country, when you're pulled over for any mistakes, you pay a fine but you can entreat the traffic police to let you go without impounding your vehicle registration papers temporaly, sometimes they disagree but sometimes they do :) This is true.

Thanks a million

StevenLoan

Re: Entreated = Implored?

Posted: Mon Apr 18, 2011 10:58 pm
by Edwin F Ashworth
Implored sounds a bit old-fashioned, Steven, and entreated and beseeched more so. Though they're not incorrect, we'd probably use begged or pleaded with instead.

PS Impound is usually used in the sense of put into a pound/enclosure, so while it's common to hear of vehicles being impounded, registration papers would usually be said to be kept temporarily rather than impounded. Confiscate would work, but has slight overtones of school-day punishments.

Disagree is not the opposite of agree to; I'd write ";sometimes they refuse, but sometimes they agree to your request."

Re: Entreated = Implored?

Posted: Tue Apr 19, 2011 4:26 pm
by Stevenloan
Dear Edwin F Ashworth and other members!

- First of all, I would like to thank Edwin F Ashworth for your post. In your post you didn't mention whether my original sentences are right or not. So I have to rewrite them this way, right?

"Yesterday my uncle was pulled over for driving in the wrong lane. The 2 traffic police officers gave him a fine of $100 and decided to keep his car registration papers for 2 weeks. He pleaded with them to let him go without a fine and not keep his car registration papers and he finally persuaded them."

Thanks a million!

StevenLoan

Re: Entreated = Implored?

Posted: Tue Apr 19, 2011 7:12 pm
by Edwin F Ashworth
Your original variants were almost correct, but sounded old-fashioned.
I'd write:

"Yesterday my uncle was pulled over for driving in the wrong lane. The two traffic police officers gave him a fine of $100 and decided to keep his car registration papers for two weeks. He pleaded with them to let him go without a fine and not to keep his car registration papers - and he finally managed to persuade them to show him leniency."

For small numbers, I feel the spelt-out form is better stylistically.

The second catenation of the third sentence (pleaded...not...keep) is better with a second to-marker.

Persuade in the sense to induce, urge, or prevail upon successfully takes more than a simple (syntactically direct) object:

I persuaded him. (OK in the sense of convinced; questionable otherwise.)
I persuaded him to buy a Trabant.