That really amused me

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That really amused me

Post by STEVENSAKURA » Tue Nov 18, 2008 5:08 am

- Last night, after drinking some bottles of beer. She talked me into getting in bed with him. That really amused me.

- Are these sentences grammatical?

Thanks very much!

STEVENSAKURA
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Re: That really amused me

Post by minjeff » Tue Nov 18, 2008 5:25 am

Last night, after having a few beers with [Sarah], she convinced me to sleep with [Sam]. I had a great time.

That's how I would say it from what I'm pulling out of the original. I must confess though that I am not 100% sure what meaning you are getting at in your last phrase.
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Re: That really amused me

Post by russcable » Tue Nov 18, 2008 6:39 am

Last night, after ...." is not a sentence by itself and should not have a period nor should "She" be capitalized.

"Some" is an uncountable amount, while bottles are countable. I drank 3 bottles, I drank a few bottles, but not I drank some bottles. I drank a few beers (by using the plural, you've indicated that you mean "servings of beer"), but I drank some beer (or a lot of beer).

"That" is ambiguous as phrased. The thing that amused you could have been getting in bed with him, being talked into something, drinking beer, or perhaps the whole evening.
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Re: That really amused me

Post by STEVENSAKURA » Tue Nov 18, 2008 11:01 am

- Sorry everyone! It was a typo. The original sentence should be:

"Last night, after drinking some bottles of beer. Sarah talked me into getting in bed with her. That really amused me."

- Is it more natural this time? :)

Thanks a lot!

STEVENSAKURA
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Re: That really amused me

Post by PhilHunt » Tue Nov 18, 2008 11:01 am

Sorry to correct you russ, some can be used with both countable and uncountable nouns. It means an unspecified quantity of something.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/worldservice/learn ... v192.shtml
Last edited by PhilHunt on Tue Nov 18, 2008 11:15 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: That really amused me

Post by PhilHunt » Tue Nov 18, 2008 11:14 am

Steven,
After having a few drinks/getting drunk, Sarah convinced me to sleep with her/persuaded me to sleep with her/talked me into sleeping with her. [I assume you mean sex, and not just sharing a bed]

Your sentence suggests that you didn't want to sleep with her and Sarah had to give you verbal reasons why you should. I don't know about other people here, but when I've been drunk in the past I didn't get into an intellectual discussion on the merits of sleeping with someone, it just kind of happened.
Also, the quantity of bottled beer doesn't mean a thing to the idea of seduction. The fact you were drunk probably does. So, an alternative could be:

After getting drunk, Sarah seduced me.
That amused me.
This means you found it funny in the same way that you may find the film 'Four Weddings and a Funeral' funny. It's ambiguous as to whether you mean the situation amused you, her convincing you amused you, or the sex amused you. You also exclude the woman in that sentence; did she enjoy it? Now, I don't know about you guys [this is a guy thing after all] but when I have drunken sex it doesn't make me titter in the same way as watching a Hugh Grant film might.

I might say: 'We had fun/a great time/a laugh/a ball.' [I would hope that the woman enjoyed it as much as you ;)]
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Re: That really amused me

Post by russcable » Tue Nov 18, 2008 5:02 pm

Yes, that was an oversight. Some can be used with countable nouns, but (IMO at least) it has a slightly different, sometimes ambigous, meaning in some of those cases - it can even mean "all there is there".
We found some bottles of beer in the cabinet and drank them. (we drank all 100 bottles that were there).
I heard some people singing outside my door. It turned out to be the 360 member Mormon Tabernacle Choir.
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Re: That really amused me

Post by PhilHunt » Tue Nov 18, 2008 8:11 pm

Russ, I would argue that in no situations can 'some' mean 'all there is'.
In your example: We found some bottles of beer and drunk them > them specifies the 'all there is' concept; some is used only to designate an unspecified quantity (could be 10, could be 100).
'Some' with a countable or uncountable noun does not express how large the quantity is. On the other hand, your example of 'a few' means a low quantity, perhaps 3-4 bottles.

If we have only+some we get the concept of a few 'only some people came to the party' but in this case it is only that reflects the low quantity.

You are just going to confuse Steve with your line of argument.

In addition: Russ is possibly reading meaning into some based on his presumption of the quantity of something in a particular situation. For example;
We found some bottles in the cabinet.
We create a mental picture of a cabinet and calculate that a cabinet cannot hold more than 10-15 bottles, perhaps.
There were some bottles of wine in the large wine cellar.
Now my mental picture of the storage space has increased, and with it the number of bottles I assume are in that space. If there were not many bottles in the large space we would prabably use 'few' instead.

We create similar metal pictures with these two sentences.
There were some people in the room.
There were some people at the concert.

I imagine the idea of how large a room is depends on your culture, wealth and home enviroment. Perhaps Queen Elizabeth would think of a minimum of 100 people in a room, where as, I could imagine no more than 20, due to the size of my house.

I guess this is an example of how our preconceptions of enviroment can influence our understanding of a neutral quantifier.
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Re: That really amused me

Post by minjeff » Wed Nov 19, 2008 8:48 pm

I would change,

"Last night, after drinking some bottles of beer. Sarah talked me into getting in bed with her. That really amused me."

to:

Last night, after drinknig a few beers [together?], Sarah convinced me to sleep with her.

I wouldn't even say the last part because a "gentleman" doesn't kiss and tell. However, if you really must I'd say, "It was good." The "It" implying sex.
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Re: That really amused me

Post by russcable » Wed Nov 19, 2008 9:44 pm

Isn't say "sleep with her" the "kissing and telling" part? (^_^)
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Re: That really amused me

Post by minjeff » Thu Nov 20, 2008 12:13 am

Touche

Maybe I was just avoiding the whole gloating portion.
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