patient

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patient

Post by hsargent » Thu Mar 27, 2008 3:02 am

I found myself explaining to my 8 year old granddaughter why patient could be someone in the care of a physician and to be willing to wait!

How did we come to such diverse meanings or does it mean you have to be patient being a patient?
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Re: patient

Post by Bobinwales » Thu Mar 27, 2008 9:47 am

And the doctor is still practicing, when everyone hopes that he is very good at it.
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Re: patient

Post by dalehileman » Thu Mar 27, 2008 4:12 pm

Bob I felt you were being ignored. But if this doesn't work maybe it will give you an idea

http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=pa ... gle+Search
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Re: patient

Post by gdwdwrkr » Thu Mar 27, 2008 4:26 pm

..which you might patent.
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Re: patient

Post by Shelley » Thu Mar 27, 2008 6:52 pm

There is a wonderful old Sesame Street video about Big Bird going to the hospital with a bad case of "tweetitis". (The doctor on duty is played by the comedian, Robert Klein.) Big Bird and the orderlies and nurses sing a great song with a calypso beat:

You've got to be patient
To be a patient

Just relax, do what the doctors say
You've got to be patient
To be a patient

And when you're (they're?) done
You can go home and play

It's a guess, but I think the name "patient" comes from the continuous state of (patient) waiting one is in during illness and recuperation. Seems too simple.
Last edited by Shelley on Sun Mar 30, 2008 4:50 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: patient

Post by zmjezhd » Fri Mar 28, 2008 4:52 pm

Patient means in Latin 'suffering, enduring'. From patior. It has another meaning in linguistics where it means something like the logical object of a verb as distinguished from the grammatical one: e.g., The book was carried in a bag. Book is the patient in the previous sentence, but the grammatical subject of the passive verb.
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Re: patient

Post by Berale » Thu Apr 03, 2008 11:46 pm

Interesting. So a patient is someone who is suffering (and hopefully will be helped by a doctor). And being patient is being able to suffer (though sometimes the suffering is not quite so huge, as in coping with having to wait five minutes before you get your sweetie) - which takes us to "long-suffering", which is also about being patient.

And in thinking about this I suddenly realised that we have a similar connection in Hebrew between patience and suffering - the Hebrew for patience is "savlanut" which comes from the same root as "sevel", suffering.

But for the medical context we have borrowed the word "patient" and just changed its pronunciation to "patz-yent" (stress on yent). Alternatively we use the word "cho-le" (rhymes with the Spanish "ole") which literally means someone who is ill.
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Re: patient

Post by hsargent » Fri Apr 04, 2008 2:06 am

But being patient, the adjective, seems to not be related to suffering; just not being anxious. So is there any relationship with the noun?
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Re: patient

Post by trolley » Fri Apr 04, 2008 3:10 am

Ah, but it is related to suffering. It is being calm and not displaying anxiety while suffering.
From Webster's 1913:
Having the quality of enduring; physically able to suffer or bear.

Having said that, I would also suggest that we need a new word to describe the large percentage of people who are under a doctor's care and, yet, display no patience at all. There's nothing like a long wait to bring out the worst in people.
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Re: patient

Post by hsargent » Fri Apr 04, 2008 2:26 pm

How about impatient! Or M-patient for mad!

But this does bring up the question.... if patient implies suffering, impatient must mean not suffering?
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Re: patient

Post by gdwdwrkr » Fri Apr 04, 2008 4:21 pm

There are always inpatience and outpatience.
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Re: patient

Post by Berale » Tue Apr 08, 2008 1:04 pm

hsargent wrote:But this does bring up the question.... if patient implies suffering, impatient must mean not suffering?
Patient = able to suffer without grumbling
Impatient = unwilling/unable to suffer without grumbling

But another definition I've heard is: patience is doing something else in the meantime. (I try to apply this when my husband is late for things - not an unusual occurrence...)
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Re: patient

Post by Ken Greenwald » Sat Apr 12, 2008 5:09 am

Harry et al, The following etymology provides some additional detail including dates:

BARNHART CONCISE DICTIONARY OF ETYMOLOGY

PATIENT

adjective: About 1350 pacient, enduring calmly, bearing (pain, etc.); later, patient (before 1400); probably influenced in development by patience [[probably before 1200]], but also borrowed from Old French pacient, adjective, and later directly as a learned borrowing from Latin patientem (nominative patiēns), present participle if patī, to suffer or endure.

noun: About 1385 pacyent, suffering or sick person under medical treatment; later patient (about 1400); borrowed from Old French pacïent, noun.
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PATIENCE noun: Probably before 1200 patience, calm endurance; also later pacience (before 1250); borrowed from Old French patience, pacience, and directly from Latin patientia, from patiēns, present participle.
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Ken – April 11, 2008
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