Australians add new words to the dictionary

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Australians add new words to the dictionary

Post by Erik_Kowal » Mon Jan 14, 2008 8:24 am

From the UK's Daily Telegraph:

Australians add new words to dictionary

By Nick Squires In Sydney

Last Updated: 2:47am GMT 11/01/2008

They gave the world budgie smugglers, sanger, arvo and barbie*, but Australians have shown themselves to be endlessly inventive, with a new collection of words and phrases added to the rich repository of Strine.

A salad dodger with man flu: Aussie dictionary

The country's biggest online dictionary, Macquarie, has included the 85 words or phrases in its latest online edition and wants Australians to vote for the one they consider most influential or apposite.

They are grouped in 17 categories, from business to travel, and include 'toad juice' -- a foul-smelling liquid fertiliser produced from pulverizing cane toads, pests which are devastating native wildlife as they hop their way across the continent's tropical north.

It is said to be especially good on banana and papaya trees.

Many of the new words invented, or adopted, by Australians reflect a growing concern for the environment.

The 'green shoe brigade' describes people who are profiting from dubious practices conducted in the name of caring for the environment - an adaptation of 'white shoe brigade', unscrupulous developers who encased much of Queensland's coast in concrete in the 1980s.

'Climate canary' is a geographical feature, plant or animal species pointing to climate change.

Some of the new terms come from New Zealand. Kiwis have taken to jokingly calling their capital, Wellington, 'Helengrad' because of the iron grip exerted by the government of prime minister Helen Clark.

Many of the words were first formulated in the United States, but have been enthusiastically adopted by Australians, including 'tanorexia' -- the obsessive cultivating of a suntan -- and 'salad dodger', an obese person.

A tattoo just above the buttocks is referred to as a pair of 'arse antlers' -- "having a central section and curving extensions on each side" -- while 'manscaping' is the removal of men's body hair for aesthetic reasons.

A person trying to juggle personal debt is a 'credit card tart', shifting loans around from one card to pay for another.

Other nominations for the online Macquarie Dictionary include 'infomania', for those who constantly put aside the job at hand to concentrate on incoming email and text messages.

'Password fatigue' is frustration at having too many passwords to remember.

But overcoming it brings the danger of 'data smog' - "electronic information as by emails, internet searches, etc., which, by its volume, impairs performance and increases stress."

'Slummy mummies' are mothers of young children who have abandoned all care for their personal appearance, as opposed to immaculately-groomed yummy mummies.

"One of my personal favourites is 'boomeritis', which describes the sports-related injuries suffered by baby boomers as they keep playing sports well into old age," said Susan Butler, the dictionary's publisher.

"We invite the public to vote on their favourite word or phrase because it gives us some idea of what they consider the most inventive or significant or humorous addition to the language.

"Last year's winner was muffin top [the band of skin sagging over a too-tight pair of trousers], which was an Australian coinage that became big in America."

Voting for a favourite word on macquariedictionary.com.au will close on January 31, with the "word of the year" announced in early February.

* swimming trunks, sausage, afternoon and barbecue
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Australians add new words to the dictionary

Post by Berale » Wed Jan 16, 2008 9:02 pm

Password fatigue - oh yes, definitely. There is one website where I must have pressed Forgotten Password every time I've logged on.
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Australians add new words to the dictionary

Post by gdwdwrkr » Wed Jan 16, 2008 11:11 pm

"Log on?" I may be living dangerously, but I have a shortcut to "Active Topics" and with one click, I'm there.
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Australians add new words to the dictionary

Post by Tony Farg » Thu Jan 17, 2008 9:02 am

Now that would be useful. How, please?
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Australians add new words to the dictionary

Post by Erik_Kowal » Thu Jan 17, 2008 9:35 am

Simple. Click on 'Active Topics' and save the resulting page as a favorite (Internet Explorer) or bookmark (Firefox).
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Australians add new words to the dictionary

Post by gdwdwrkr » Thu Jan 17, 2008 10:04 am

And, having saved the shortcut to desktop, drag the icon to the blue stripe at the bottom(tray?), where, once ensconced, with one click, up comes the list of active topics, or on Fridays, "NO ACTVE TOPICS".
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Australians add new words to the dictionary

Post by Phil White » Thu Jan 17, 2008 2:42 pm


Originally posted by gdwdwrkrAnd, having saved the shortcut to desktop, drag the icon to the blue stripe at the bottom(tray?), where, once ensconced, with one click, up comes the list of active topics, or on Fridays, "NO ACTVE TOPICS".
Yes, well observed. Everyone's in the pub on Fridays.
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Australians add new words to the dictionary

Post by gdwdwrkr » Thu Jan 17, 2008 4:27 pm

Ha! I thought they were actually working to get something done before the weekend!
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Australians add new words to the dictionary

Post by Shelley » Fri Jan 18, 2008 6:44 pm

Today's New York Daily News has a short feature on the city's Aussie restaurants, with a list of food names and phrases to be found on the menu, for those who like to order in a foreign language!
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Australians add new words to the dictionary

Post by trolley » Fri Jan 18, 2008 7:19 pm

Since it had to be explained, I take it that you folks don't have HP Sauce in the States. That seems kinda odd. How can you eat your sausages?
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Australians add new words to the dictionary

Post by gdwdwrkr » Sat Jan 19, 2008 5:08 am

If H is for horseradish, then you're talking half-sense.
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Australians add new words to the dictionary

Post by Wizard of Oz » Sat Jan 19, 2008 9:34 am

.. a few comments ..
  • coffee - Aussies have the definite benefit of an Italian heritage when it comes to our coffee .. and yes cafes here can rise and fall on the ability of their barista ..
  • jaffles - best made in a specialist jaffle iron thrust preferably into a fire but over a gas flame will do .. fillings can be as inventive as your gourmet taste ..
  • lamingtons .. can be made plain but best with a cream and jam filling .. a great way to use up that stale cake ..
    Lamingtons are apparently named after Charles Baillie, 2nd Baron Lamington, who served as Governor of Queensland from 1896 to 1901. However, the precise reasoning behind this is not known and stories vary. Lord Lamington was known to have ironically hated the dessert that had been named in his honour, once referring to them as “those bloody poofy woolly biscuits”.
    Source:Benjamin Christie
  • Moreton Bay bugs - in NSW we get Balmain bugs which are a different species .. never thought of bugs as looking like a lobster .. bug meat has a taste of its own and people who don't like lobsters will often like bugs ..
  • Tim Tams .. for the purist there is only one Tim Tam and it is chocolate .. this was the way before Arnotts was bought out by some monster American conglomerate who subtely set about Americanising our biscuits .. and one of the first was the appearance of caramel, raspberry, mint, double-choc and the like .. now these might be lovely biscuits but they are NOT Tim Tams .. some American at Campbells soups may love them so they might like to call them whatever kind of "cookie" they like, just not Tim Tam ..
  • "With the lot" .. they forgot THE most quintessential element of an Aussie burger .. the slice of beetroot .. it would also have some bacon and onion .. the large bun would be toasted and the sauce would run down over both your hands as you held it .. no prissy Maccas production line stuff ..
.. but it is good to see our flag getting a small wave in New York .. our chefs are world class and Aus does have a fused cuisine all of its own that has been slowly developing ..

WoZ of Aus 19/01/08
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Australians add new words to the dictionary

Post by Bobinwales » Sat Jan 19, 2008 4:49 pm

Surely that little store that Shelley uses for all things British sells HP Sauce. How can anyone live without it?
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Australians add new words to the dictionary

Post by gdwdwrkr » Fri Jan 25, 2008 10:00 pm

Phil White wrote: <blockquote id="quote" class="ffs">quote:<hr height="1" noshade="noshade" id="quote" />Originally posted by gdwdwrkrAnd, having saved the shortcut to desktop, drag the icon to the blue stripe at the bottom(tray?), where, once ensconced, with one click, up comes the list of active topics, or on Fridays, "NO ACTVE TOPICS".
<hr height="1" noshade="noshade" id="quote" /></blockquote id="quote">Yes, well observed. Everyone's in the pub on Fridays.

What happened today!!?? Pubs closed!!??

O No! It's happening again.....
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Australians add new words to the dictionary

Post by paulwiggins » Wed Jan 30, 2008 1:25 am

Wiz wrote:
coffee - Aussies have the definite benefit of an Italian heritage when it comes to our coffee .. and yes cafes here can rise and fall on the ability of their barista ..


With my only lament about that being I think Parisians bring a defter touch to the art than Italians.
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