electric jet engine

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electric jet engine

Post by dalehileman » Sun May 27, 2007 4:44 pm

Headline, Victorville CA Daily Press

SCLA a player in electric jet engine

If a phrase can be misinterpreted, as a former prescriptivist I will misinterpret it. My first reaction was that an electric engine had been developed to power a jet

...especially after reading, "As Boeing begins assembling its electrically powered Dreamliner 787..." Of course I shortly dismissed the idea, owing to the prohibitive mass of the required battery

It is of course an advanced engine, but I'm sure it uses conventional fuel. The aircraft was called "electric" thanks to high-tech electrical bells and whistles such as LED lighting

Owing to space limitations a headline can often convey a mistaken impression. But would anyone else have had the same reaction
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electric jet engine

Post by Erik_Kowal » Sun May 27, 2007 4:57 pm

In my case, yes. But I was more perplexed by the abbreviation SCLA, until I figured out that it probably referred to 'Southern California Logistics Airport', not 'sex-crazed Los Angeles'.
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electric jet engine

Post by Wizard of Oz » Tue May 29, 2007 12:52 am

.. yes Dale I can see that and that is exactly what I thought .. and I am sure all the members of the Sub Cortex Learning Association are hard at work on minaturising the solar powered batteries .. all 10 000 of them ..

WoZ
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electric jet engine

Post by Ken Greenwald » Tue May 29, 2007 6:24 am

Dale et al, My immediate reaction on reading the headline:
<“SCLA a player in electric jet engine”>
and the only one that made (and still makes) any sense to me, was that the turbines of a jet engine would be run by an electric motor. And the only practical way of accomplishing this I assumed would be to have maybe some sort of fuel (not necessarily jet-fuel – since we are not talking powering a jet-fueled engine – but this seemed odd in that it would appear to present a big logistics supply problem) running a generator which provides the electrical power for the electric jet engine. Hmm. Interesting! But I wondered why that would be more efficient than running a normal jet engine directly on standard jet fuel. But I supposed that somehow GE had come up with a system in which perhaps a non-jet fuel, or maybe even standard jet fuel, running a generator whose power was fed into an electric jet engine would be cheaper or somehow more efficient than the standard system.

Upon reading the article, however, it seems clear to me that the article was horribly written and is extremely misleading (e.g. ‘electrically powered’ Dreamliner – it is NOT electrically powered, it is undoubtedly powered by standard jet fuel in a new and more efficient GE jet-fueled engine) and that the headline writer had totally screwed up. All that was going on was that General Electric Aviation was running a test using a new and highly efficient jet-fuel-powered General Electric jet engine on a modified Boeing 747, and Southern California Logistics Airport (SCLA) was playing a key role in the testing of this engine. So, it seems fairly obvious to me now that the headline should have read:

<“SCLA a player in General Electric jet engine.”>
__________________

Ken – May 28, 2007

Also see:[h]www.aero-news.net/index.cfm?printable=1 ... e5fb98cef1 [/h]
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electric jet engine

Post by Erik_Kowal » Tue May 29, 2007 7:19 am

The article in question is located at http://www.tmcnet.com/usubmit/2007/05/27/2665929.htm . It entirely fails to explain the technology being used in the engine being tested, or how it supposedly contributes to making the engine more efficient.

Its journalistic standard clearly qualifies the author to replace Tony Snow, G W B's current Press Secretary. Either that, or he/she has a bright future reporting for the local TV news.
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electric jet engine

Post by Edwin Ashworth » Tue May 29, 2007 10:32 am

I remember reading that Southern California's Leading Administrator announced that he had had one of his 16-wheel-drive fleet converted to hydrogen power in a bid to suggest a reduction in carbon footprint. I remember that there is "heat leakage" whenever energy is converted from one form to another on a practical scale (Second Law of Thermodynamics), and that there are no hydrogen trees.

Of course, eccletritic vacuum cleaners are not in the same league as the Nimbus 2000 series of broomsticks for efficiency, though the jury is still out on the long-term effects of the use of Floo Powder.
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electric jet engine

Post by gdwdwrkr » Tue May 29, 2007 4:09 pm

SCLA is "See which Can Land Ahead of the other". The wonderful competition is between the Rolls Royce and the electric-jet (tsk, hyphenate), one on each wing. First runner-up goes to the engine that spins the plane its way the most.
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electric jet engine

Post by paulwiggins » Fri Jun 22, 2007 12:09 am

Head should have read


Here's a link to a web site that has got its coverage right, notably correctly naming the companies involved.

http://www.bizjournals.com/cincinnati/s ... from_rss=1
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electric jet engine

Post by daverba » Sun Jul 22, 2007 7:20 pm

This article seems to explain the electric jet engine in question.

http://www.sciam.com/article.cfm?articl ... A1F437150A

Keep in mind that a "jet" engine merely refers to an engine that produces thrust by creating a "jet" in comparison to an airscrew/propeller or a traction (such as a locomotive/automobile). Thus, you could power a heating element (eg, a toaster) with a battery that would heat the air and make a turbojet run without burning a carbon-based fuel (gasoline, ethanol, etc) to heat the air, and you could call it an "electric jet engine."

The electric jet engine in the article technically seems to be an electric motor-driven ducted propeller engine and not a true "jet" engine.

The category of jet engines include: animals (squids/octopuses), ramjets, scramjets, both "valved" and "valve-less" pulsejets (eg, V-1s/Buzzbombs/Doodlebugs/Loons) and the more recent PDEs (Pulse Detonation Engines).

Here are examples of trying to make a very simple valve-less pulsejet engine work (but using a glass jar is ABSOLUTELY crazy):

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AePLpM5SnqE

Here's another, more sophisticated valveless pulsejet engine:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4P0xfhjBNUM

Quite frankly, the red-hot glowing metal frightens me, but you can find videos on YouTube of people riding pulsejet-driven go-karts.
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