Pronunciation of similar vowels

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Pronunciation of similar vowels

Post by Quoc » Sun Dec 10, 2006 4:30 am

Please tell me the difference in pronunciation between:

1/ /^/ in Ago, bird, love

2/ /^/ in love and young

3/ /^/ in "bird", "her", "worm", "learn"... and /^/ in love


Thanks

Quoc
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Pronunciation of similar vowels

Post by Erik_Kowal » Sun Dec 10, 2006 10:04 am

Presumably you intend the symbols /^/ to signify the vowel sounds you have marked in bold.

Quite why you have chosen to do this is unclear to me.

Unfortunately the programming code of this forum is unable to display the symbols of the International Phonetic Alphabet. I would therefore recommend instead that you look up each of these words in turn on the online Merriam-Webster dictionary site (http://www.m-w.com) and click on the red loudspeaker symbol. You will then hear the words pronounced on your computer speakers with an American English accent, as often as you want.
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Pronunciation of similar vowels

Post by dalehileman » Sun Dec 10, 2006 3:41 pm

1/ /^/ in Ago, bird, love

***In ago and love, pron "uh" as in such. The "ir" in bird is pron "rr" as in fur

2/ /^/ in love and young

***same, "uh"

3/ /^/ in "bird", "her", "worm", "learn"... and /^/ in love

***In her, worm, and learn, same as in bird
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Pronunciation of similar vowels

Post by Quoc » Mon Dec 11, 2006 12:53 am

My last question:

The trancription phonetics in my dictionary for "a" (in "ago"), "ir" (in "bird")and ("o" in "love") is different.

ago, bird and love

Please tell me more the way I can use to pronounce correctly /^/ in only these 3 words.

Are /^/ in these 3 words the same sound? If not, how to distinguish them?(I heared them from my online dictionary but I can't distinguish them).

Quoc
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Pronunciation of similar vowels

Post by Shelley » Mon Dec 11, 2006 2:21 am

Hi Quoc.
The ^ sound in ago and love is almost exactly the same sound. It is the sound you produce when you say "cup" or "up". You simply have your lips relaxed, your jaw half open and your tongue resting on the bottom of your mouth. I say almost, because the sound in "ago" is even more relaxed as it is in an unstressed syllable. The phonetic symbol for that looks like an upside-down "e" (called a schwa).
The sound in "bird" is very different, because it involves an "r" sound. To produce it, you have to bring your lips forward slightly, bring your jaw slightly more closed, and tense the back of your tongue just a little while still leaving it on the bottom of your mouth. The phonetic symbol for the "r" sound looks like a backwards 3.
Good luck. They say that the reason "r's" and "l's" are so difficult for babies (and other people) to learn is because they can't see what the tongue is doing when the teacher/parent/modeler is producing it!
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Pronunciation of similar vowels

Post by gdwdwrkr » Mon Dec 11, 2006 1:23 pm

Shelley, do they note similar learning-difficulties in the blind, I wonder?
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Pronunciation of similar vowels

Post by Bobinwales » Mon Dec 11, 2006 3:26 pm

I think we will probably get into arguments if we start talking about pronunciations here.

In the UK we do not pronounce “ago” and “love” with the same sound as “cup”. We would say “A year ah-go”, and “Love” usually has a longer vowel sound than “cup”. Although, in fairness “Where are you going, Luv?” is heard.

I have always thought the classic example of the different pronunciations on either side of the Atlantic is the fact that to us an ass is a donkey, the thing we sit upon is an arse, and that “r” is not an affected spelling, we actually say it.

It does strike me that Quoc is in need of a good teacher near where s/he lives. This is no way to learn the language.
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Signature: All those years gone to waist!
Bob in Wales

Pronunciation of similar vowels

Post by gdwdwrkr » Mon Dec 11, 2006 8:30 pm

Sure beats the way my Brasillian buddy, Ozzie, learned English....by listening to country music.

Quoc is teaching us how to answer questions.
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Pronunciation of similar vowels

Post by Quoc » Mon Dec 11, 2006 11:16 pm

Hi,

You wrote:

The ^ sound in ago and love is almost exactly the same sound. It is the sound you produce when you say "cup" or "up". You simply have your lips relaxed, your jaw half open and your tongue resting on the bottom of your mouth. I say almost, because the sound in "ago" is even more relaxed as it is in an unstressed syllable. The phonetic symbol for that looks like an upside-down "e" (called a schwa).
The sound in "bird" is very different, because it involves an "r" sound. To produce it, you have to bring your lips forward slightly, bring your jaw slightly more closed, and tense the back of your tongue just a little while still leaving it on the bottom of your mouth. The phonetic symbol for the "r" sound looks like a backwards 3.
Good luck. They say that the reason "r's" and "l's" are so difficult for babies (and other people) to learn is because they can't see what the tongue is doing when the teacher/parent/modeler is producing it!

1/ What does a backwards 3mean?

2/
You mean: /^/ in "bird", "ago" and "love":
The same: tongue is on the bottom of mouth.
The difference: Only /^/ in "bird": tense the back of your tongue

a/ I don't think so. I think with /^/ in "ago" and "love", we also tense the back of our tongue. Therefore, I can't see the difference. How about your opinion?

b/ tense = raise? If not, what does it means?

Thanks
Quoc
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Pronunciation of similar vowels

Post by gdwdwrkr » Mon Dec 11, 2006 11:22 pm

On second thought,Quoc, put on some George Strait
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Pronunciation of similar vowels

Post by Quoc » Mon Dec 11, 2006 11:42 pm

Hi,

I searceh on Google, on yahoo, on many dictionaries I have, I met my England friends, I hear them pronounce them but I can't distinguish them. I hear they pronounce them the same sound.

Now, please share with me your experience in pronoucing them.
Thanks
Quoc
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