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Post by Quoc » Fri Dec 01, 2006 8:32 am

Please read:

We throw strong support behind the impressive work of reforming the economy that is being hastened in your country. We are also standing by the political shake-ups in which people from all walks of life are involved.

1/In this context, what is the meaning of throw? Is throw strong support an expression? If so, what does it mean?

2/ In this context, what is the meaning of strong?


Thanks

Quoc
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Post by Erik_Kowal » Fri Dec 01, 2006 12:19 pm

I suspect that in terms of its origins, the expression in 1) refers to supplying military support to front-line troops. A more common expression is "to provide [or supply] support".

Here, 'strong' means 'considerable' or 'substantial', possibly with a suggestion that the support provided is being supplied in an obvious or well-publicised manner.
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Post by hsargent » Fri Dec 01, 2006 2:59 pm

Throw means to give with force.

Support could be primarily verbal.

throw strong support could be synonymous with express and that would be strictly verbal. Throw strong support could be with changes in policy. It would depend on who made the comment.
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Post by Quoc » Sat Dec 02, 2006 12:16 pm

Hi,

1/ Erik_Kowal wrote:

Here, 'strong' means 'considerable' or 'substantial'

What is the difference in meaning between considerable and substantial? Are they interchangeable?

2/ Hsargent wrote:

Throw strong support could be with changes in policy.

Is be with changesan expression? If yes, what is the meaning of be with sth?

Quoc
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Post by gdwdwrkr » Sat Dec 02, 2006 4:24 pm

be with= be pertaining to
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Post by dalehileman » Sat Dec 02, 2006 5:40 pm

I would have replied that "considerable" means just a whole lot, while "substantial" implies also being pertinent or helpful

However, Laverne, who is far smarter than I, says pretty much the opposite, that "considerable" means juat slightly more than a little bit, while "substantial" means a whole lot

So we need a reading by one of you guys who's smarter than either of us
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Post by gdwdwrkr » Sat Dec 02, 2006 5:57 pm

Now, Dale, who's going to do that!?
While I defer, I'll say they are interchangeable. One considers what matters. Matter is substance. Both matter. The tone in which either is said helps define meaning....I guess it's like Chinese.
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Post by Erik_Kowal » Sat Dec 02, 2006 6:32 pm

Context plays an important part in this kind of judgment, as does individual perception. There is no absolute answer.
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Post by dalehileman » Sat Dec 02, 2006 9:18 pm

Poor Quoc
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Post by hsargent » Tue Dec 05, 2006 3:33 pm

be with changes is not an expression.

be is a verb, with is a preposition, changes is a noun. They act independently.

I was simply trying to make the distinction that changing a policy is more than just giving lip service (which is an expression)!
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