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Post by Quoc » Sat Nov 18, 2006 4:30 am

Please read:

Pension fund members and endowment holders do not have the right to vote at annual meetings but they can raise concerns about companies held on their behalf with trustees and fund managers. Few, however, take the time to find out how their money is being invested.

As well as connecting workers and the companies they own, Pitt-Watson argues that more accountability can bring together hard-nosed capitalists and left-wing campaigners. He quotes both right-wing economist Milton Friedman, saying 'the social responsibility of business is to maximise its profits', and Labour founding father Keir Hardie, who argued that the final battle for the worker was to 'make property his servant, not his master'.

1/ What is the meaning of endowment holders in this context?

2/ with = by ? If not, what does it mean? If not, please explain me the meaning of "companies held on their behalf with trustees and fund managers".

3/ as well as = besides (preposition) ?

4/ What is the meaning of connecting in this context?

5/ Does Labour founding father Keir Hardie mean Keir Hardie the person creating this party? If not, what does it mean?

Quoc
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Post by russcable » Sat Nov 18, 2006 7:37 am

2) They can raise concerns (with trustees or fund managers) (about companies held on their behalf). Both () phrases go with "raise concerns". In other words, the members can express their concerns to the trustees and fund managers because the funds directly own the stocks of the companies in question.

3) Yes. "In addition to" would also work there.

4) As in 2) the fund managers are a bridge connecting between the workers and the companies. The workers and the companies whose shares are in the pension funds do not communicate directly.

5) Yes. See: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Keir_Hardi ... bour_Party

As a side note, Milton Friedman, who was mentioned in the quote, died Thursday at the age of 94.
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Post by Quoc » Sat Nov 18, 2006 10:13 am

Hi,

How about your opinions about my first question? ( What is the meaning of endowment here)?

Quoc
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Post by dalehileman » Sat Nov 18, 2006 3:44 pm

Though I'm hardly an expert on matters fiscal, I would assume an endowment holder to be somebody or some institution possessing an endowment. Often the latter is gifted to the holder
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Post by Quoc » Sat Nov 18, 2006 4:37 pm

Hi,

You wrote:
Though I'm hardly an expert on matters fiscal, I would assume an endowment holder to be somebody or some institution possessing an endowment. Often the latter is gifted to the holder.

I know that, but what is the exact meaning of endowment here?

Thanks
Quoc
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Post by russcable » Sat Nov 18, 2006 6:59 pm

I think that the difference in insurance jargon between an endowment policy and a pension policy is that an endowment policy pays out the entire benefit in a lump sum while a pension policy pays out in a series of payments. I have no way to research this further that is not also available to you.
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Post by Quoc » Sun Nov 19, 2006 2:36 am

Hi,

I also know that. What I don't know is: What endowment mean?

In this context:

Endowment = Insurance

Or Endowment = money that is given to institutions to provide it with an income. ?

If Endowment = Insurance

What kind of insurance?

Quoc
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Post by Erik_Kowal » Sun Nov 19, 2006 7:20 am

Quoc, I'm with Russ regarding the finer points of the financial vehicles you are inquiring about. The technical information you are now asking for goes beyond explanations of the fundamentals of English usage or help with interpreting sentences that appear confusing.

You would do better to consult an encyclopedia, or a glossary produced by a specialist financial institution, to achieve the level of detail you are seeking.
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Post by Quoc » Sun Nov 19, 2006 10:24 am

Thanks,

Now return to my second question. This is a grammatical question.
Please read:

Pension fund members and endowment holders do not have the right to vote at annual meetings but they can raise concerns about companies held on their behalf with trustees and fund managers. (1)

= Pension fund members and endowment holders do not have the right to vote at annual meetings but they can raise concerns with trustees and fund managers about companies held on their behalf. (2)

= Pension fund members and endowment holders do not have the right to vote at annual meetings but they can discuss their worries with trustees and fund managers about companies held on their behalf. (3)

= Pension fund members and endowment holders do not have the right to vote at annual meetings but they can can discuss their worries about companies held on their behalf with trustees and fund managers . (4)


1/ Is (1)= (2)= (3)= (4)? (are they the same meaning?)
2/ If yes, held is past participle. So, how can I write again the sentences as follows:

Pension fund members and endowment holders do not have the right to vote at annual meetings but they can raise concerns with trustees and fund managers about companies that are held on their behalf by............... (by who?)

= Pension fund members and endowment holders do not have the right to vote at annual meetings but they can discuss their worries with trustees and fund managers about companies that are held on their behalf by............... (by who?)


Thanks

Quoc
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Post by dalehileman » Sun Nov 19, 2006 4:56 pm

1/ Is (1)= (2)= (3)= (4)? (are they the same meaning?)

Pension fund members and endowment holders do not have the right to vote at annual meetings but they can raise concerns about companies held on their behalf with trustees and fund managers. (1)
]
****Ambiguous, as I have indicated. Not clear whether trustees hold companies or merely serve as consultants. I would have preferred "by" though Laverne likes "with"

= Pension fund members and endowment holders do not have the right to vote at annual meetings but they can raise concerns with trustees and fund managers about companies held on their behalf. (2)

***Same as (1)

= Pension fund members and endowment holders do not have the right to vote at annual meetings but they can discuss their worries with trustees and fund managers about companies held on their behalf. (3)

***Same as (1) though worries are usu more serious than concerns

= Pension fund members and endowment holders do not have the right to vote at annual meetings but they can can discuss their worries about companies held on their behalf with trustees and fund managers . (4)

***Same as (3) except for can can


2/ If yes, held is past participle. So, how can I write again the sentences as follows:

Pension fund members and endowment holders do not have the right to vote at annual meetings but they can raise concerns with trustees and fund managers about companies that are held on their behalf by............... (by who?)

****by whom? .....by the latter (or) ....by their own (or) ....by other trustees and fund managers about whom they have concerns (or) ...by bureaucrats in Putin’s regime of fiscal control and dominance

********Onshore, however, Laverne points out that trustees are usu involved in wills etc whereas fund managers handle mutual funds, and these two have entirely different jobs; so in any case it would be very unlikely for both to be at the same meeting


As for past participles, I'm worn out and Laverne is flagging but perhaps Ken can help you
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Post by hsargent » Mon Nov 20, 2006 1:08 am

I believe I defined Endowment in another thread.

Endowment is an investment mechanism to create income forever. The Endowment Policy is created to maintain the base amount (Corpus) plus the impact of inflation.

Endowment Holders is not a normal term. Endowment Committees manage the fund (select investment instruments and establish policy).

With insurance, the proper term is anuities. These are investments to provide a benefit (i.e. pension, insurance, etc.). When the recepient dies, the residual funds in the anuity return to the company.

I am curious at for what purpose you are asking these many diverse questions. Are you writing a book or only learning more English?
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Post by Quoc » Mon Nov 20, 2006 1:40 am

No, I don't write any books. I simply learn English.

You wrote:

Endowment is an investment mechanism to create income forever.

I know that, but what kind of investment mechanism? Only insurance or anything ?

Quoc
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Post by hsargent » Mon Nov 20, 2006 2:49 pm

Insurance is not an income mechanism. Insurance is a payment when a loss is experienced. If you have house insurance and the house does not burn, you get no money. If you have health insurance and you don't get sick, you get no money. When you die, you get insurance payment if you did not live too long ... I have to die in the next 16 years (term insurance with a set premium)

Endowment Funds would be invested in stocks, bonds, money markets, Certificates of deposit, and mutual funds primarily.

This is always a difficult decision for an Endowment Committee. Bonds, money markets, and CDs are more secure but give less return typically. The US Stock Market averages 8% return over the life of the market but in the years 1998 - 2002 there were 40-50% losses.

This is an example of the Capitalist System. There are many ways to make money but there are risks with no guarantees.
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Post by Quoc » Mon Nov 20, 2006 3:25 pm

Hi,

You wrote:

1/ Endowment Funds would be invested in stocks, bonds, money markets, Certificates of deposit, and mutual funds primarily.

What does Certificates of deposit and mutual funds primarily mean?

This is always a difficult decision for an Endowment Committee. Bonds, money markets, and CDs are more secure but give less return typically. The US Stock Market averages 8% return over the life of the market but in the years 1998 - 2002 there were 40-50% losses.

What does CDs mean?


Thanks

Quoc

PS: I understand endowment now.
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