jagged

This is the place to post questions and discussions on usage and style. The members of the Wordwizard Clubhouse will also often be able to help you to formulate that difficult letter.

jagged

Post by Spearmint » Sun Mar 26, 2006 2:26 am

I was at a sawmill the other day, and someone was helping me load firewood onto my truck. I told him, if he wanted to, there was enough wood in my truck, and we could quit loading. He said, "No, lets throw a few more on there. I'd hate to see you leave jagged." Meaning, he didn't want me to leave without a full load. Has anyone ever heard of this usage before?
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS

jagged

Post by Ken Greenwald » Sun Mar 26, 2006 7:43 am

Dear Spear, JAG and evidently the adjective JAGGED, which I was unable to find an example of, are from U.S. (Northern, North Midland, and Western U.S.) and British (Norfolk) dialect. In England it refers mainly to a load (usually a small cart-load) of hay, wood, etc. In the U.S it refers to a light or partial load, a small quantity/portion, or sometimes ‘a bit,’ and it is often used to refer to hay and firewood. <“Give the bay mare a jag of oats”>, <“People bought jags of things they didn’t need.”>, <"He had a jag of hay to take in.">
<1597 “You shall have my carte to carrie home a IAGG of haye when you wonn.”— ‘First Part of Return from Parnassis,’ II. i.page 747>

<1636 “The quantity of two loade or JAGGS of hey at the Iland Creeke.”—‘Plymouth Colony Record’ (1855), I. page 40>

<1688 “A JAGG of Hay is a small Load of Hay.”—‘The Academy of Armory, or a Storehouse of Armory and Blazon’ by R. Holme, III. page 73/1>

<circa 1828 JAG, an indefinite quantity, but less than a load, of hay or corn in the straw.”—‘The vocabulary of East Anglia’ by Forby> [[Norfolk dialect]]

<a1862 “Their companion a cow, their wealth a JAG of drift-wood.”—‘Cape Cod’ (1894) by Thoreau, x. page 326>

<1927 “. . . and a real hillman would probably say i]JAG[/i] rather than bit.”— ‘American Speech,’ The Ozark Dialect in Fiction, Vol. 2, No. 6, March, page 288>

<1942 “JAG: Small load of freight.”—‘American Speech,’ Truck Driver Lingo, Vol. 17, No. 2. Part 1, April, page 104>

<1953 “It [[JAG]]] means a light load, a comparatively small quantity: ‘Tell Jim to fetch me up a little JAG of cookwood.’ I think JAG is more often used in reference to hay and firewood than anything else.”—‘Down in the Holler – A Gallery of Ozark Folk Speech’ by Randolf & Wilson, page 163>

<1961 “. . . JAG, which may mean ‘armload,’ ‘small stack,’ or ‘forkful of hay.’ But here there seems to be a unified over-all meaning, perhaps ‘small manageable load.’— ‘American Speech,’ Semantic Features and Eastern Relics in Colorado Dialect, Vol. 36, No. 4, December, page 268>
(Oxford English Dictionary, Random House Unabridged Dictionary, Merriam-Webster’s Unabridged Dictionary, Facts on File Dictionary of American Regionalisms)
_____________________

Ken G – March 26, 2006
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS

jagged

Post by Edwin Ashworth » Tue Mar 28, 2006 7:46 pm

So would two jags be large and unmanageable?
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS

jagged

Post by Erik_Kowal » Tue Mar 28, 2006 8:49 pm

Not if you can make magic happen when you say "Hey! Prescott!"
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS
Signature: -- Looking up a word? Try OneLook's metadictionary (--> definitions) and reverse dictionary (--> terms based on your definitions)8-- Contribute favourite diary entries, quotations and more here8 -- Find new postings easily with Active Topics8-- Want to research a word? Get essential tips from experienced researcher Ken Greenwald

jagged

Post by gdwdwrkr » Wed Mar 29, 2006 12:37 am

How much wood can you put in your Jaguar's trunk?!
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS

jagged

Post by Ken Greenwald » Wed Mar 29, 2006 12:54 am

And, of course, Mick comes from a long line of rolling Jaggers!
_____________________

Ken G – March 28, 2006
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS

jagged

Post by Edwin Ashworth » Thu Mar 30, 2006 10:25 am

In the sixties, the Harrison Ford was preferred by many to the Rolls Jagger.
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS

jagged

Post by Erik_Kowal » Fri Mar 31, 2006 8:58 am

Of course, both were a poor match for the later Austin's power.
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS
Signature: -- Looking up a word? Try OneLook's metadictionary (--> definitions) and reverse dictionary (--> terms based on your definitions)8-- Contribute favourite diary entries, quotations and more here8 -- Find new postings easily with Active Topics8-- Want to research a word? Get essential tips from experienced researcher Ken Greenwald

jagged

Post by Edwin Ashworth » Sat Apr 01, 2006 3:32 pm

The older generation also went on record saying that neither could compete with a decent Singer.
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS

jagged

Post by Wizard of Oz » Sun Apr 02, 2006 2:40 am

.. and any Aussie would know FJ Holden as being the way to ride ..

WoZ of Aus 02/04/06
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS
Signature: "The question is," said Alice, "whether you can make words mean so many different things."

jagged

Post by Wizard of Oz » Sun Apr 02, 2006 6:51 am

.. to come back to the original word jag ..
Spearmint said:

I'd hate to see you leave jagged.
.. now in Aus this would have a whole different meaning in the context given .. seeing as how the person had been physically involved in loading firewood onto a truck he would be jagged but with the meaning of being worn out from physical exursion .. I am not sure were this meaning of jag comes from or if it is somehow related to a peculiarly Aus meaning of the word jag ..

.. in Aus we use the word jag to mean ..
Collins Australian Dictionary jag: 2. (Aust) to catch (fish) by impaling them on an unbaited hook.
.. this type of fishing has in the past been banned and is regarded as more good luck then good angling .. the unbaited jag hook, which is usually a large treble hook, is cast out over a shoal of fish then quickly pulled back hard, ie jagged back, and if you are lucky will foul-hook one or more fish ..

.. this type of quick action fishing, with it's inherent element of luck, gives rise to a slang usage whereby to jag something means to get something quickly by no real skill but with plenty of luck as in, "He jagged a dance with that bird last night." ..

.. another slang usage derived from this type of fishing is described in the following ..
Sydney Morning Herald, 26th March 2006. "And the lesson was painful. Just two balls into his innings, Symonds received a brute of a bouncer from Ntini, which jagged back off the wicket and thundered into the grille of his helmet."
.. this describes a movement of the ball that moves back very quickly as if pulled by an invisible string as an allusion to the way the hook is jagged back quickly by the fisherman ..

WoZ of Aus 02/04/06
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS
Signature: "The question is," said Alice, "whether you can make words mean so many different things."

jagged

Post by Erik_Kowal » Sun Apr 02, 2006 7:24 am

Speaking of striking it lucky through chance, we should not forget to mention Texas Holden, the popular American car game.
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS
Signature: -- Looking up a word? Try OneLook's metadictionary (--> definitions) and reverse dictionary (--> terms based on your definitions)8-- Contribute favourite diary entries, quotations and more here8 -- Find new postings easily with Active Topics8-- Want to research a word? Get essential tips from experienced researcher Ken Greenwald

jagged

Post by Wizard of Oz » Tue Apr 18, 2006 12:13 am

.. aha .. with access to the OED I am able to find another level of elucidation ..
Source OED

jag, v.

1. trans. To pierce with a sharp instrument, to stab. Obs. exc. as in b.

?1400 Morte Arth. 2087 Sir Loth..Enjoynede with a geaunt, and jaggede hym thorowe. Ibid. 2891, 2893 Thorowe a jerownde schelde he jogges hym thorowe,..Ioyntes and gemows, he jogges in sondyre.
1507 DUNBAR Sevin Deidly Sinnis 41 Sum iaggit vthiris to the heft, With knyvis that scherp cowd scheir.
1607 TOPSELL Four-f. Beasts (1658) 283 First, turn up his upper lip, and jagge it lightly with a launcet, so as it may bleed.
1611 BEAUM. & FL. Philaster V. iv, Jag him, Gentlemen.
1809 SOUTHEY in Q. Rev. II. 37 He saw them jag the cocoa-shell for the purpose.

b. Sc., north. Eng., and U.S. dial. To prick with something sharp, as with a spur or thorn.

1700 in J. Watson Coll. Poems (1706) I. 39 (Jam.) He bade her ride, And with a spur did jag her side.
1819 Blackw. Mag. V. 640* May ne'er a thorn hae power to jag the hide upon his shins.
1852 R. S. SURTEES Sponge's Sp. Tour I. 286 He now whipped and jagged the old nag, as if intent on catching the hounds.
1883 C. F. SMITH Southernisms in Trans. Amer. Philol. Soc. 50, Jag, ‘to prick or pierce with a thorn or any sharp-pointed thing’. Common in various parts of the South.
1893 in Northumbld. Gloss.
.. from this I can now see where the name for the particular fishing method probably derived .. but naturally I am still very disillusioned that specific US usages are given but not the specific Aust usage .. in Aus we have a saying One in, All in. and it seems that the OED does not subscribe to this ideal ..

WoZ of Aus 18/04/06
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS
Signature: "The question is," said Alice, "whether you can make words mean so many different things."

jagged

Post by Erik_Kowal » Tue Apr 18, 2006 2:05 am

WoZ, I suggest you contact the OED to supply them with whatever information you feel they are failing to include. When all is said and done, the OED editors cannot possibly do all the spadework themselves, and they depend greatly on contributions from individuals all around the globe to supplement their efforts. In my view, this is a much more likely explanation for any lapses on their part than a conspiracy to exclude or ignore the speech of Australia.
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS
Signature: -- Looking up a word? Try OneLook's metadictionary (--> definitions) and reverse dictionary (--> terms based on your definitions)8-- Contribute favourite diary entries, quotations and more here8 -- Find new postings easily with Active Topics8-- Want to research a word? Get essential tips from experienced researcher Ken Greenwald

jagged

Post by Wizard of Oz » Tue Apr 18, 2006 1:00 pm

.. thanks Erik .. point made and taken ..

WoZ

PS .. Ken where do I write to ?????
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS
Signature: "The question is," said Alice, "whether you can make words mean so many different things."

Post Reply