Americanisms

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Americanisms

Post by Mel » Mon Jan 09, 2006 10:57 pm

Americans have no problem with Illinois, Iroquois, or India.
This leads me to blame immigrants from the Emerald Isle who call themselves EYE-RISH!
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Americanisms

Post by Colin Harry Jackson » Mon Jan 09, 2006 11:51 pm

andrew :

surely scots are people who are born in scotland, and the language they speak is English,apart from the very few who know some celtic
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Post by Wizard of Oz » Tue Jan 10, 2006 12:52 am

.. Phil what a very erudite explanation .. takes me back to my days at Uni listening to Prof Cattell and all those late night tutorials studying drunken cant in the Union Bar .. but mate you do take all of the fun out of it .. I mean if we are to follow your lead and just accept that Yanks and Poms and Aussies and Kiwis and the like actually DO speak English then how can we payout on those grating bloody Americanisms that are bringing about the end of civilisation as we know it ?? .. what fun will there be left if we can't laugh at Hinglish and Chinglish and take the superior high road because WE speak correct English ?? .. no mate, sorry, as correct as you may be it just ain't fun that way .. *grin* ..

WoZ of Aus 10/01/06
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Americanisms

Post by Slateman » Tue Jan 10, 2006 2:02 am

One big pronunciation difference amongst americans is the pronunciation of the "O" in words such as "production" or "process". Americans in Canada (I'm playing with the word American since really everyone from northern Canada to the south or Chile is an "American") pronounce these words starting with the sound of the word "pro" (as in golf pro). Almost all folks from the USA pronounce these words with an O sounding more like an "a", as in the word "bra".

A really amusing accent is the one from the Philadelphia area. I can't really describe how they prounce words such as "home", "coke", "cherry" and even the name of their own city, but the pronunciations are really different. For those of you from the region, imagine someone from South Philly saying "I'm going home to have a Coke and a hoagie"... lol
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Post by norton112200 » Tue Jan 10, 2006 3:52 am

I would like to state just how equally...different sounding foreigners sound to us Americans, and where I'm from (a suburb of saint louis, so i hear what is sometime known as "midwestern slang", though the way i like to extenuate vowels or pronounce things differently is mostly unmidwest and more or less an invetion of my own, but thats not the point) just about any dielect other than midwest to southern is made fun of, so just as odd that Brits pronouce it Al-ew-min-ium as opposed to Al-ew-min-um, or the auto garash as opposed to an auto garoj, not to mention the kind of slang brits and aussies have that we are utterly confused about.
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Post by kagriffy » Tue Jan 10, 2006 4:09 pm

Here in the Midwest, there is generally no distinction between the pronunciations of an ink PEN and a safety PIN (or TEN and TIN, WIN and WHEN, etc.). Most Midwesterners pronounce them all with the short "i" sound. I had a friend in college who was originally from upstate New York. She thought it was horrible that we all pronounced "pen" like "pin." She was always correcting us and acting superior--until the time I called her out on adding an extra "r" to "sherbet." After that, she would just silently cringe at our Midwestern idiosyncracies. *G*
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Post by russcable » Tue Jan 10, 2006 5:07 pm

ka, from m-w: Main Entry: sher·bet Pronunciation: 'sh&r-b&t Variant(s): also sher·bert /-b&rt/
You may need to apologise to your friend, she was "right" all along. My third grade teacher spent about an hour trying to get us to hear the difference between pin and pen before giving up in disgust. Then there was the phonics book that tried to tell us that engine and egg started with the same sound ^_^
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Post by Colin Harry Jackson » Tue Jan 10, 2006 8:18 pm

Wikipedia.org :-

Curiously, the United States adopted the -ium for most of the 19th century with aluminium appearing in Webster's Dictionary of 1828. However in 1892 Charles Martin Hall used the -um spelling in an advertising handbill for his new efficient electrolytic method for the production of aluminium, despite using the -ium spelling in all of his patents filed between 1886 and 1903. It has consequently been suggested that the spelling on the flyer was a simple spelling mistake rather a deliberate choice to use the -um spelling. Hall's domination of production of the metal ensured that the spelling aluminum became the standard in North America, even though the Webster Unabridged Dictionary of 1913 continued to use the -ium version.

In 1926, the American Chemical Society officially decided to use aluminum in its publications, and American dictionaries typically label the spelling aluminium as a British variant
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Post by Erik_Kowal » Wed Jan 11, 2006 4:08 am

Colin, that's not the whole story regarding 'aluminum' versus 'aluminium': in 1990 the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) adopted 'aluminium' as the standard international name for the element. See the thread Genre or Register? for more details.
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Americanisms

Post by Colin Harry Jackson » Wed Jan 11, 2006 2:30 pm

Erik, Thanks for that, I will need all the amunition I can get, every year My Wife and I stay on a trailer Park in Arizona for a month with elderly relatives, we spend a lot of time sitting around camp fires and discussing this and that with our American Neighbours, and the question of pronunciation always arises,so because I am nearly always outnumbered a little outside help is appreciated.
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Post by norton112200 » Wed Jan 11, 2006 2:35 pm

aparently people in st. louis and in that area we tend to say stuff like warsh (as opposed to wash) or far(as opposed to four)
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Post by Shelley » Wed Jan 11, 2006 6:40 pm

Slateman wrote: A really amusing accent is the one from the Philadelphia area. I can't really describe how they prounce words such as "home", "coke", "cherry" and even the name of their own city, but the pronunciations are really different. For those of you from the region, imagine someone from South Philly saying "I'm going home to have a Coke and a hoagie"
Slateman, I lived in Pittsburgh for a few years. The dialect is unique and wonderful: "youns" for "you" when addressing a group; the "ow" sound being relaxed to an "ah" sound as in "dahntahn" for "downtown"; the twist on the long O (hoagie, coke) becomes, as in Philadelphia, a flat, long, almost two-syllable "hay-ougie and a cay-ouke). Then there is the substituted "w" for "l" in some cases, so you get "Stee-wers" for their beloved football team (which also might account for the name Phiwadewphia being unintelligible). "Hah baht dem Stee-wers? Youns gay-oin' dahntahn fer a hay-ougie an' a cay-ouke?" There are a few more I could mention (“tiara” becomes “chara”), but this gives you an idea. Meryl Streep, an actress who is not afraid to tackle a dialect, did a pretty good job of it in “The Deer Hunter”. She could have gone further with it, but I think she wanted to make sure her lines could be understood!
kagriffy, I guess you put her complaints on ice! Sherbert is legit (barely), but I had to have some arguments about it before I (grudgingly) saw the light.
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Post by kagriffy » Wed Jan 11, 2006 7:07 pm

It's not just a St. Louis thing, Norton. A large number of Midwesterners (especially from South-Central Illinois, where I grew up) put an "r" in "wash." It took me years of practice to get rid of it.
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Americanisms

Post by Andrew Dalby » Thu Jan 12, 2006 9:50 pm

Colin Harry Jackson wrote: andrew :

surely scots are people who are born in scotland, and the language they speak is English,apart from the very few who know some celtic
Sorry I didn't answer, I've been away. You may say that, yes, but I'm certainly not the only person who says that the Germanic language spoken in Scotland has been different enough from English -- and has had enough of a literature -- to have its own name. And Scots is the name it's usually given.
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Post by Slateman » Sun Jan 15, 2006 5:48 am

Shelley: I agree with your post in most respects. I would say though that while the Philly accent has some similiar aspects to the Pittsburgh accent, I'd classify Pittsburgh as having more of a mid-western (almost a hint of Chicago )edge to it compared to Philly. As you noted, the way Meryl Streep spoke in the Deer Hunter is definitely indicitive of a Pittsburgh accent, but not really Philly. I think the big difference is that Philly has influences from the Delaware/northern Maryland accent which has more Cornish sounds/influences. The way they say "home" for example is identicle to the Delaware way of saying it.
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