legal limit

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legal limit

Post by JANE DOErell » Sun Nov 06, 2005 6:54 pm

I asked a retired truck driver and he said that six years ago when he got out of the grind in the US driving with too much blood alcohol was DUI, Driving Under the Influence. He said there were several situations which drivers referred to in slang as DOL, Driving Over the Limit. These included driving too many hours, but usually driving with too much weight or driving too fast.

He added that the rest stop regulations were so complicated that they were often violated deliberately or out of confusion.
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legal limit

Post by Edwin Ashworth » Wed Nov 09, 2005 9:16 pm

It's worse over here - we don't know whether the 45-minute, 28-day or 90-day rule defines the legal limit.
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legal limit

Post by minjeff » Wed Nov 09, 2005 9:30 pm

How about: Many lorry drivers on the roads are exceeding the legal limit of driving hours due to ignoring the mandatory breaks.

However, I do agree that a legal minimum of breaks makes the wording ever so clearer. ;)
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legal limit

Post by please » Sat Nov 12, 2005 7:32 pm

Nothing worked so far. Many good contributions of high substance but the dilemma is still there. When "legal" is around, "limit" takes our minds to the upper limit and not to the lower limit. Neither do we have a powerful word to mean the opposite of exceeding (a limit). The language seems not responding if the concept is not well established in our minds. So the answer would be in making it up. We have a mandatory "rest period" and the words "legal limit". How can we formulate a phrase by using "rest period" and "legal limit" to mean that drivers are required not to rest less than the period imposed on them by law?
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legal limit

Post by minjeff » Sat Nov 12, 2005 9:17 pm

Should we invent words then? Replace "exceed" with "subcede" and modify "limit" to be "nether-limit" (or just replace it with minimum). Then the sentence would read: Many lorry drivers on the roads are subceding the legal nether-limit (minimum) of roadside breaks, giving them too many consecutive driving hours.

Using "subcede" shouldn't muddle the meaning too much, as a matter of fact while talking out loud asking for the opposite of "exceed" my roommate suggested "subcede". The "nether-" prefix merely clarifies which end of the limit spectrum to which you are referring.
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legal limit

Post by kagriffy » Sun Nov 13, 2005 11:06 pm

How about this: Many drivers are exceeding the legal limit for consecutive driving hours, because they are not taking the legally mandated rest periods. This seems to clarify the problem fairly well. The legal limit (maximum) which the drivers are "exceeding" is the number of consecutive hours driving, not the rest periods. By stating this as an excess beyond the "legal limit," you are then free to clarify how the drivers are exceeding this by referring to the mandated rest periods.
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legal limit

Post by dalehileman » Mon Nov 14, 2005 12:21 am

Kag: "Many drivers are exceeding the legal limit for consecutive driving hours, because..." could be interpreted to mean that the cause of their driving drunk for more than one hour at a time is their failure to observe the mandated rest periods, the implication being that they are not observing the opportunity to sleep it off
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legal limit

Post by Erik_Kowal » Mon Nov 14, 2005 7:01 am

Thank goodness we've finally sorted it all out.
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legal limit

Post by kagriffy » Mon Nov 14, 2005 1:36 pm

Dale, you seem to assume that "legal limit" can refer only to DUI/DWI. Although that may be the most common connotation, it is by no means the only "legal limit." For example, if a fisherman exceeds the legal limit by catching too many fish in one day, I don't believe anyone (besides you) would even CONSIDER that the fisherman was drunk!
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legal limit

Post by dalehileman » Mon Nov 14, 2005 3:55 pm

Kag: My implication is that because "legal limit" so often applies to DUI, a typical reader might make that assumption
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legal limit

Post by dalehileman » Mon Nov 14, 2005 4:04 pm

dalehileman wrote: Kag: My implication is that because "legal limit" so often applies to DUI, a typical reader might make that assumption
Again forgive my feeble attempt at humoor
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legal limit

Post by kagriffy » Mon Nov 14, 2005 7:04 pm

Dale, I'll agree that a driver exceeding the "legal limit" MIGHT imply a DUI situation, but only if the "legal limit" were unqualified. In my example, I said they had exceeded "the legal limit FOR CONSECUTIVE DRIVING HOURS . . . ." I really don't think a "typical" reader would assume that I meant a driver had been driving drunk for several hours. A "typical" reader would read the entire sentence in its context, and wouldn't jump to such ridiculous conclusions. You've got to have a little faith in the reader's intelligence.
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legal limit

Post by minjeff » Mon Nov 14, 2005 9:15 pm

Do we really believe that most readers are intelligent?
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legal limit

Post by dalehileman » Tue Nov 15, 2005 1:29 am

Kag: Alas, surely you must realize I jest, jest a bit
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legal limit

Post by Erik_Kowal » Tue Nov 15, 2005 9:00 am

You must now add subtlety to the list of your virtues, Dale. :-)
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