two times

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two times

Post by pingpong fan » Wed Aug 10, 2005 10:19 pm

I was wondering about this query for some time, I don't know if it's worth discussing. I saw use of the phrase "two times" in Time Mag. maybe, or think I heard an American commentator say: "Tiger Woods two times winner of the British Open at The Old Course". It's a USA thing definitely, I have noticed. We would have said twice in the same context, wouldn't we? How come? Any comments would be welcome please.
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Post by russcable » Thu Aug 11, 2005 2:30 pm

Usually we would say "Tiger Woods, two-time winner of the British Open, ..." (notice time not times). While this may seem awkward for 2, does it seem less awkward when you get to "Lance Armstrong, seven-time winner of the Tour de France, ..." The pattern holds even when you get to numbers that have no corresponding term... 72, 1433, etc.
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Post by Erik_Kowal » Thu Aug 11, 2005 5:33 pm

One could also announce without awkwardness, "Tiger Woods, twice the winner of the British Open at The Old Course"; or for that matter, "Lance Armstrong, seven times the winner of the Tour de France".
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two times

Post by pingpong fan » Sat Aug 13, 2005 8:05 pm

russcable wrote: this may seem awkward for 2, does it seem less awkward when you get to "Lance Armstrong, seven-time winner of the Tour de France, ..." The pattern holds even when you get to numbers that have no corresponding term... 72, 1433, etc.
Well this was hardly my point or query, I was saying the phrases "one time" or "two time" instead of once or twice represents a difference of usage in your country Russ, there are no others up the numerical scale except thrice. No alternative to saying Europe 4 time winners in the last 5 Ryder Cups, for instance.
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Post by russcable » Sat Aug 13, 2005 11:06 pm

Yes, that was exactly my point. In fact, we would don't even like the word thrice, so why bother having a pattern that only works for one and two? As the song goes, "You're once, twice, three times a lady..."
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Post by haro » Sun Aug 14, 2005 11:52 am

Languages hardly ever are logical. Why do we say 'two-timing' instead of 'twicing'? A bit off topic, I know, but interesting ;-)
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Post by pingpong fan » Mon Aug 15, 2005 1:02 pm

haro wrote: Languages hardly ever are logical. Why do we say 'two-timing' instead of 'twicing'? A bit off topic, I know, but interesting ;-)
Nice one Haro, I for one certainly could not think why exactly but twicing would be uneuphonious if that's a word. Cheers - FRANK
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Post by Bobinwales » Mon Aug 15, 2005 2:11 pm

My guess is because "two-timing" is an American expression, and we have already discovered that Americans haven't got a twice.
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two times

Post by Shelley » Mon Aug 15, 2005 5:05 pm

Of course we have a twice: we have a twee, don't we?
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Post by Edwin Ashworth » Mon Aug 15, 2005 6:18 pm

But you can't see Tiger Woods for the twee.
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Post by Erik_Kowal » Tue Aug 16, 2005 5:50 am

Edwin, you are forgetting the twee lines of the immortal Blake:

"Tiger, Tiger, birdying bwight
In the fowests of the night..."
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two times

Post by Shelley » Tue Aug 16, 2005 2:43 pm

Dat's some biiiig puddy-tat!

Signed, Tweety
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