Page 2 of 4

Chatspeak stole my internet!

Posted: Tue Jun 14, 2005 9:24 am
by Erik_Kowal
That depends -- I'm not the boss of you now! ;-)

Chatspeak stole my internet!

Posted: Thu Jun 16, 2005 4:28 pm
by dalehileman
ShellY: Thank you, but what I meant was that because "IM" is often used as a synonym for internet slang, then couldn't it be used almost interchangeably with "chatspeak"

Chatspeak stole my internet!

Posted: Thu Jun 16, 2005 5:25 pm
by Erik_Kowal
Dale, IM stands for 'Instant Messaging', not 'Internet Slang'.

Chatspeak stole my internet!

Posted: Thu Jun 16, 2005 6:36 pm
by dalehileman
Erik yes, I realize that, but "IM" is often used to mean internet slang

Chatspeak stole my internet!

Posted: Thu Jun 16, 2005 8:14 pm
by russcable
No, "IM" is sometimes used to mean "IM slang" - 4s 1'/3 +r13d +0 p01n+ 0|_|+ teh n3t > 1// (as I've tried to point out the internet is greater than IM) but nobody ever listens to me ~~~~>_<~~~~~

Chatspeak stole my internet!

Posted: Fri Jun 17, 2005 12:25 am
by spiritus
Some behaviors provide their own causes.

Chatspeak stole my internet!

Posted: Fri Jun 17, 2005 12:43 am
by spiritus
Phil White wrote: Like any nonstandard usage, it can be (deliberately) incomprehensible to outsiders. I personally initially thought "lol" meant "lots of love" (fat chance). My prediction: one or two examples will make it into mainstream writing and possibly spoken language in the next ten years.

As far as the habit damaging people's ability to use language "correctly" is concerned, I'm not at all sure. I believe that the computer revolution of the past 20 years and the Internet revolution of the last 10 years are merely showing a clearer picture of the range of language skills that really are out there in the wild.

The fact that huge numbers of office workers have a PC on their desks and write material (even material which is subsequently published) for which they would not have been responsible 20 years ago, coupled with the fact that written material no longer goes through the hands of secretaries, the typing pool, typesetters and then back to the author for proofing, all means that even pretty formal material often contains quite significant errors of grammar and spelling and, more fundamentally, gross errors in communication. Much of what is published on the Web is written by people from backgrounds (primarily professional, but also social) in which they may well not have had access to any means of publication 20 years ago.

The same is true of chatrooms, forums and SMS. Many people who 20 years ago would possibly never have picked up a pen and paper willingly after they left school are now happily texting, chatting and contributing to forums.

And I'm not at all sure that it's a bad thing. Exposure to written language (some of it good!) and a willingness to communicate in written form are at least steps forward for many people.

What I can't condone is sloppy, uncommunicative writing on the part of people who are paid to communicate (marketing executives, technical authors, managerial and office staff who write letters, etc.), but I think that's sadly unavoidable now that the PC is pretty well ubiquitous and publishing just a click away.
Phil,

My intention was to selectively quote your posting; but, to my thinking, every point made was relevant and coincedes with my views on the issue. I believe your words warrant repeating.

It may be argued, by some, that youth is wasted on the young; though I would assert, it is often creativity and imagination that is under used by the mature.

Chatspeak stole my internet!

Posted: Tue Jul 17, 2007 8:17 am
by fffreak121
Oh look!! Teenagers who share my opinion...i'm shocked. I'm 15 years old and most say i'm an idiot for not typing like a complete brainless git. Anyway...

If any of you have ever played games like, World of Warcraft, Runescape, or some other internet game, your surrounded by chatspeak. Once i was on one of those, i typed out a fill, complete...unchatspoke sentence, and someone actually said "wat does tht mean j00 n33b?" Do these people think before they speak? Honestly, i've seen people in my class actually write essays and research papers in chatspeak becuase they use it so much. One person wrote this:

"this research paper is about george bush and his role as president his role as president is to govern our country and to command our armies and protect his from harm sept 11th was a mistake george bush made a small error that cost hundreds of lives to be lost then he decided for us to go to war with iraq..."

Ummm...Thats even a paragraph. Its one big run on sentence (yes i'm serious...He almost turned that in for a grade...). And then I have other friends who "lol, rofl, lmao, lmfao" after anything they type. If I find something funny, i type "haha" not "l0l tht w45 50 c001!!oneshiftoneoneelevenshiftone." Until now, i didn't even KNOW that "imo" meant "in my opinion." I have yet to meet anyone on any of those online games actually have a brain to type out a complete sentence. Sure i let an "lol" slip once in a blue moon...but i don't "lol" anything. People need to take the time to type out a whole sentence. An extra 5-10 seconds won't trouble your time, don't worry.

But there's my two-sense on this matter.

Chatspeak stole my internet!

Posted: Tue Jul 17, 2007 9:07 am
by gdwdwrkr
I hear what your smelling.

Chatspeak stole my internet!

Posted: Tue Jul 17, 2007 9:27 am
by Edwin Ashworth
It will soon be non-PC to omit the l33t versions from public notices. How that will work in Urdu, ICI.

Chatspeak stole my internet!

Posted: Tue Jul 17, 2007 9:10 pm
by MamaPapa
Although I'm not offended by chatspeak, I also haven't adopted the habit of abbreviating everything I write or say. I am inclined to point out that abbreviated speech (and writing) has been around long before the internet...even among pop culture and the music industry. Prince's 1981 hit "Jack U off" comes to mind as one example that is more than 25 years old. I am no longer a teenager but have used the word "pip" for decades to refer to "proprietary information protection". One can pip documents (shred them) and use the word as a verb; or, using the word as a noun, one can withhold information as pip (protected/unshared). I've also heard "cya" (pronounced as see-why-aye) used for 30 years or more in regular conversation. I gleaned the concept but never knew it to be abbreviated speak until about 1995. We've also been writing "fyi" since I can remember...

The more recent additions that I have allowed into my own speech/written usage are: "prolly", meaning "probably" (it IS a little shorter to type) and "btw", meaning "by the way".

Nearly all of the English-speakers of my acquaintance know the meaning of rsvp, but few of the same people would be able to pronounce the actual phrase for which it is substituted. They simply say "are-ess-vee-pee".

BTW, I lol when I hear someone actually say "i.e." rather than "that is".

Chatspeak stole my internet!

Posted: Wed Jul 18, 2007 12:13 am
by gdwdwrkr
So, who can't say "respond so very promptly"?

Chatspeak stole my internet!

Posted: Wed Jul 18, 2007 9:20 am
by Erik_Kowal
RSVP comes from 'répondez, s'il vous plaît' (French for 'please reply').

Chatspeak stole my internet!

Posted: Wed Jul 18, 2007 4:11 pm
by Tony Farg
I just have a suspicion that gdwdwrkr might have known that!

Chatspeak stole my internet!

Posted: Wed Jul 18, 2007 4:34 pm
by gdwdwrkr
What? Shirley Feeney had it wrong?