jingoistic

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jingoistic

Post by Archived Topic » Sat Oct 16, 2004 7:41 pm

Does anybody know if the origin of this word is in anyway Japanese related?

If you need to look up the meaning then you don't know.
Submitted by Xinch ( - Ireland)
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jingoistic

Post by Archived Reply » Sat Oct 16, 2004 7:56 pm

Xinch, Not Japanese related. But I’m not that smart – I had to check a dictionary! The word is used in three different senses:
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Random House Unabridged Dictionary

JINGO: Noun 1) a person who professes his or her patriotism loudly and excessively, favoring vigilant preparedness for war and an aggressive foreign policy; bellicose chauvinistic [are you there, Dubya?]
2) English History: a Conservative supporter of Disraeli’s policy in the Near East during the period 1877–78. 3) BY JINGO! informal: An exclamation used to emphasize the truth or importance of a foregoing statement, or to express astonishment, approval, etc. [a mild oath] <I know you can do it, by jingo!> Adjective 4) of jingoes 5) characterized by jingoism

Etymology: 1660–70; [used formerly as an exclamation by conjurers when producing something by sleight of hand] originally conjurer's called ‘hey jingo’ appear! come forth! (opposed to ‘hey presto’ hasten away!), taken into general use in the phrase ‘by Jingo,’ euphemism for ‘by God’; chauvinistic sense from ‘by Jingo’ in political song supporting use of British forces against Russia in 1878]
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Facts on File Encyclopedia of Word and Phrase Origins

“We don’t want to fight, yet by Jingo / if we do / We’ve got the ships, we’ve got the men, / and the money, too”

This refrain form the British music hall song ‘The great MacDermot’ (1878), urging Great Britain to fight the Russians and prevent them form taking Constantinople, gives us the expression JINGOISM, for ‘bellicose chauvinism or excessive patriotism.’ JINGO is a euphemism for ‘by Jesus’ that dates back to the late 17th century. The British fleet did scare off the Russians from Constantinople.
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Ken G – December 15, 2003



Reply from Ken Greenwald (Fort Collins, CO - U.S.A.)
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jingoistic

Post by Archived Reply » Sat Oct 16, 2004 8:10 pm

Thanks Ken, that is just what I was after. I had mistakenly assumed that JIN was a derivative of some japanese word due to similarity between their national behaviour and it being a word in use in japanese.
I guess when I think about it there are very few words in use in the English language that have asian origin so it was a longshot.
Reply from Xinch ( - Ireland)
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jingoistic

Post by Archived Reply » Sat Oct 16, 2004 8:25 pm

I could have sworn we had discussed this but couldn't find it in the archives....

Lois, December 16, 2003
Reply from Lois Martin (Birmingham, AL - U.S.A.)
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jingoistic

Post by Archived Reply » Sat Oct 16, 2004 8:39 pm

jingo-vu perhaps?
Reply from Xinch ( - Ireland)
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jingoistic

Post by Archived Reply » Sat Oct 16, 2004 8:53 pm

It'll probably be under "John, Paul and George".
Reply from Edwin Ashworth (Oldham - England)
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Re: jingoistic

Post by PhilHunt » Thu May 05, 2011 12:42 pm

I came across this passage on the BBC website:
The chants of "U-S-A! U-S-A!" and the pumping fists felt, at times, like mindless jingoism, but this was a moment of national catharsis and it was an undeniably powerful spectacle.
I found the etymology in this thread on WW but I also found this snippet of info on Dictionary.com:
–noun
2. English History . a conservative supporter of Disraeli's policy in the Near East during the period 1877–78.
&
chauvinistic sense from by Jingo in political song supporting use of British forces against Russia in 1878.
I guess the 'patriotic' sense of the word comes from this period, but I'm a bit confused as to why chauvinism and political support go hand in hand here...was it something to do with the feminist opposition to the British forces in Russia?

Regarding the etymology, I found a new hypothesis from the OED:
The suggestion that it somehow derives from Basque Jinko "god" is "not impossible," but "as yet unsupported by evidence" [OED].
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