ageda..(?sp)- as a way to say upset

This formerly read-only archive of threads dates back to 1996, but as of March 2007 is open to new postings. For technical reasons, the early dates shown do not accurately reflect the actual date of posting.

Feel free to add new postings to any of the existing threads in the archived forums, but please create any new language-related threads in one of the Language Discussion Forums.
Post Reply

ageda..(?sp)- as a way to say upset

Post by Archived Topic » Sun Oct 10, 2004 5:46 am

i've used the phrase "that gives me ageda" since i was a little kid- recently i said it at work & a coworker thought i was nuts- he never heard of that word before...i understood it to mean an upset stomach ..... but i can't find it anywhere to prove it's meaning....where did i get this word from?
Submitted by ( - )
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS
Signature: Topic imported and archived

ageda..(?sp)- as a way to say upset

Post by Archived Reply » Sun Oct 10, 2004 6:01 am

If you're Jewish, you have the wrong spelling. It's 'agada' the variation of Haggadah. Maybe??

Al of Rhode Island

Reply from ( - )
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS
Signature: Reply imported and archived

ageda..(?sp)- as a way to say upset

Post by Archived Reply » Sun Oct 10, 2004 6:15 am

agitarsi italian mispronounced by most italian americans who are mostly from southern italy and sicily.
Reply from ( - )
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS
Signature: Reply imported and archived

ageda..(?sp)- as a way to say upset

Post by Archived Reply » Sun Oct 10, 2004 6:29 am

The word you are looking for is "agita." It has been discussed earlier. See discussion 2069 in the Archives.

Leif, WA, USA
Reply from ( - )
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS
Signature: Reply imported and archived

ageda..(?sp)- as a way to say upset

Post by Archived Reply » Sun Oct 10, 2004 6:44 am

Wasn't it in a famous Sinatra number? "Ageda kick outv you..."
EA
Reply from ( - )
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS
Signature: Reply imported and archived

ageda..(?sp)- as a way to say upset

Post by Archived Reply » Sun Oct 10, 2004 6:58 am

that's not even bad.
Reply from ( - )
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS
Signature: Reply imported and archived

ageda..(?sp)- as a way to say upset

Post by Archived Reply » Sun Oct 10, 2004 7:13 am

I hesitate to add anything to what was already said in that massive, very thorough, and interesting discussion in the Archive, but I actually did find ‘agita’ in the first dictionary I checked, they didn’t list it as slang, and they gave an unambiguous etymology.

In the Archive discussion, I was a bit surprised to hear that ‘agita’ was a common New York City Italian-American expression – “a quintessential Italian-American slang word” according to Word Detective – since I was born and raised in Brooklyn in the 1940s/50s in a Jewish/Italian/Irish neighborhood, thought I new all the lingo, and am unfamiliar with it. After seeing the 1980s date given by Random House for first appearance in print in English, I suspect that the word was probably not popular back in my day – certainly not in the ‘capeesh’ league if I never heard of it – and conclude that it must have came into vogue more recently.
_____________________________________

Random House Unabridged Dictionary

AGITA noun: 1) heartburn; indigestion 2) agitation; anxiety [1980-85, American; from Italian ‘agitare’ from Latin ‘agitare,’ agitate]
_____________________________________

Ken G – November 4, 2003

Reply from Ken Greenwald (Fort Collins, CO - U.S.A.)
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS
Signature: Reply imported and archived

ageda..(?sp)- as a way to say upset

Post by Archived Reply » Sun Oct 10, 2004 7:27 am

Thanks for the answers!!! I had a funny feeling I was spelling it the wrong way & sure enough, I was! It was a pleasant surprise to find out I wasn't using the word in the wrong way....thanks again to everyone.
Reply from ( - )
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS
Signature: Reply imported and archived

ageda..(?sp)- as a way to say upset

Post by Archived Reply » Sun Oct 10, 2004 7:41 am

My understanding of this word Ageda (pronounced a-geee-da)
is that it is the proper name of the symbol of two vertical lines crossing over two horizontal lines, like what we call the 'hash' sign today, or the pound weight sign in some countries. It used to be a very common export shipping 'wool mark' put on the hessian sacking containing bales of wool, and designated by the owner/shipper of the wool for recognition by the eventual buyer, maybe continents away. Many symbols were used; diamonds, squares, circles, top hats, etc. Usually an order number plus a bale number ie 1-20, 2-20 etc., would accompany the wool mark. These marks would be put on the outer sacking by the 'dump store' using stencils and spray paint. The dump store/wool store compresses the wool under great pressure into bales for shipping on instruction from the wool owner. As an employee of a shipping company that shipped millions of bales of New Zealand wool for export, an exporter would phone up the shipping company, book space on such and such a ship, number of bales, and the marking of them. The crossed lines were always referred to as Ageda. Ken/Auckland
Reply from ( - )
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS
Signature: Reply imported and archived

ACCESS_END_OF_TOPIC
Post Reply