floozy

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floozy

Post by Archived Topic » Sun Oct 10, 2004 4:49 am

Etymology unknown say online sources, 1911 given as earliest use, any additional info on origination appreciated.
A. Trent-Lyon UK
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floozy

Post by Archived Reply » Sun Oct 10, 2004 5:03 am

Dear A., ‘Etymology unknown’ has never stopped lexicographers and others from taken some pretty good guesses as to word and phrase origins.

FLOOZY/FLOOZIE/FLOOSIE/FLOOSEY/FLOOGY/FALOOSIE/FLUGIE: A gaudily dressed, cheap and tawdry, not overly bright, disrespectable, frequently high-spirited, flirtatious women of easy morals, often a prostitute. According to one source (Random House) ‘floozy’ is believed to be an derisive alteration of the word ‘flossy’ (or ‘flossie’) which was circa 1900 slang for a young women which deteriorated into a term for the tawdry, immoral women or prostitute. According to another (Flexner), it probably (the OED says ‘perhaps’) derives from the late 19th century Victorian colloquialism ‘flossy,’ meaning shiny, ostentatious, fancy, saucy, showy, excessively grand, which comes form the word ‘floss,’ a soft silky material – “The word then deteriorated in meaning.” A less interesting explanation is that that the word just derived from ‘Flossie,’ a nickname for Florence, but there is not much support for that. The Facts on File Encyclopedia of Word and Phrase Origins claims that the word first appeared as ‘flugie’ at the turn of the century (i.e. circa 1900).

The first appearance in print with its current meaning appeared in 1909 in ‘White Slavery’ by Chrysler, page 30: “Tell that floosie to cut out that yelping.” ‘Ibid’ page 176: “He don’t care for the ‘cheap floosies’; he’s out after a ‘doll.’” Interestingly the word ‘floozie,’ along with ‘red-hot momma’ were two words, among others, banned from use in movies for many years by the so-called ‘Hays Code’ (1934) which was long the moral code of the American film industry. But the popular 1945 song ‘The Flat-Foot Floogy with the Floy Floy’ breathed new life into the word (‘floogy’ and ‘floozy’ interchangeable). Here ‘flat-foot’ probably refers to the fact that the floozy had ‘professional standing’ (<:) and the ‘floy floy’ refers to some kind of venereal disease.

A Brit (according to Facts on File) commenting on the word ‘floozy’ said “This American slang is ‘picturesque’ and should be retained for its ‘blousy’ flowered atmosphere’ suggesting ‘good spirits, gaudy flowered dresses, and bad but delightful perfume” – By Jove old chap, get thee to a brothel! (<:)

(Facts on File Word and Phrase Origins, Random House Historical Dictionary of American Slang, Listening to America by Flexner)
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Ken G – November 3, 2003





Reply from Ken Greenwald (Fort Collins, CO - U.S.A.)
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floozy

Post by Archived Reply » Sun Oct 10, 2004 5:17 am

Does the word Sleezy have a connection with Floozy?

Ahmed
BC Canada
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floozy

Post by Archived Reply » Sun Oct 10, 2004 5:32 am

The term floozy is in general usage in Ireland, especially in Dublin. While it's not relevant to the discussion, you may be interested to know (or may not be)that in Dublin a popular convention has been to give nicknames to any new stutues or monuments.

Thus a sculpture of a lady in a waterpool was commonly known as the "floozy in the jacuzzi" "the whore in the shore" " the bitch in the ditch" - you get the idea.....

Is this commonplace elsewhere?

Liam - Galway
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