Propitiation

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Propitiation

Post by Archived Topic » Sat Oct 09, 2004 12:58 am

I am familiar with the meaning and definition of this word and have followed all instructions of researching it first. However, in all the research I could not find an etymology for this particular word. It appears to have come into the lexicon somewhere around the 14th century. The Greek equivalent is 'hilasterion', but it is not listed as an etymology for the word but rather as a translation.

I am just curious as to its origin. Does it have roots in Latin?

Sam - 31/10/03
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Propitiation

Post by Archived Reply » Sat Oct 09, 2004 1:13 am

Sam, It’s interesting. I would have thought that ‘propitiation’ derived from the verb ‘propitiate,’ but it appears that it was probably the other way around and that ‘propitiate’ is a back formation from ‘propitiation.’ The Barnhart Concise Dictionary of Etymology has ‘propitiation’ as first appearing in print in 1395 (late Middle English) and ‘propitiate’ in 1583.

PROPITIATION, the act of placating, making favorably inclined, appeasing, comes from the late ecclesiastical Latin ‘propitiationem’ (nominative ‘propitiatio’), an atonement, which derives from Latin ‘propitat-’ past participle stem of ‘propitiare,’ render favorable, from ‘propitus’ favorable, gracious.

(New Shorter OED, Barnhart Concise Dictionary of Etymology)
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Ken G – October 31, 2003


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Propitiation

Post by Archived Reply » Sat Oct 09, 2004 1:27 am

It's interesting that many Christian theologians differentiate between the concepts involved in atonement - an almost technical,dispassionate, legal forgiving of man's wrongdoings - and propitiation, giving God grounds to overwrite his perfect hatred of the sinner with love for the sinner. E A
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Propitiation

Post by Archived Reply » Sat Oct 09, 2004 1:41 am

Thank you Ken. I appreciate it.

Sam 02/11/03
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