Jay Canton NY

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Jay Canton NY

Post by Archived Topic » Fri Oct 08, 2004 10:49 pm

What is the origin of the word death

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Jay Canton NY

Post by Archived Reply » Fri Oct 08, 2004 11:03 pm

you are pushing your luck
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Jay Canton NY

Post by Archived Reply » Fri Oct 08, 2004 11:17 pm

Everything is relative. When did you die?

Al of Rhode Island

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Jay Canton NY

Post by Archived Reply » Fri Oct 08, 2004 11:32 pm

Dear What is the origin of the word death, In spite of my best search effort and attempts at a reasonable guess, I cannot come up with anything on the etymology of ‘Jay Canton NY.’ Perhaps next time.
__________________________________________________________

Ken G – October 30, 2003



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Jay Canton NY

Post by Archived Reply » Fri Oct 08, 2004 11:46 pm

and while we're at it what's the origin of origin???????
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Jay Canton NY

Post by Archived Reply » Sat Oct 09, 2004 12:01 am

You slay me, Ken. E A
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Jay Canton NY

Post by Archived Reply » Sat Oct 09, 2004 12:15 am

This word 'death' has been posted for some time now. Apparently no one has any idea of its origin. Well, I'll give it a shot, what the hell, I get all the tough crapy ones that die.

Multiple Origins of death soliloquy. (An injunction)

There are a HOST of ; 'origins of death.' Humans die every second and death in all cases originate at the last breath. However, when the last breath occurs is unknown; hence, deaths soliloquy; should we bury now or wait for more signs making sure we don't bury alive?

The word 'death' is an appointment all must meet at the sand box, and is an unknown to the appointee; and more to the point, (to the conscious) unknowable and a bootless quest.

Al of Rhode Island

So when thou hast as I Commanded thee,
done blabbing—Although to give the lie
Deserves no less than stabbing—
Stab at thee he that will,
No stab the soul can kill.

by Sir Walter ?
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Jay Canton NY

Post by Archived Reply » Sat Oct 09, 2004 12:29 am

.. here take your pick >>>>
1. Etymology: Middle English deeth, from Old English dEath; akin to Old Norse dauthi death, deyja to die
2. ETYMOLOGY: Middle English deeth, from Old English dath.
3. Etymology: Old English dēaþ , from a prehistoric Germanic base that also produced English die
4. |ETYM| Old Eng. <deth>, <death>, AS. <deáth>; akin to OS. <dôth>, Dutch <dood>, German <tod>, Icel. <dauthi>, Swed. & Dan. <död>, Goth. <dauthus>; from a verb meaning <to die>. Related to <Die>, <Dead>.
.. better still just look in a dictionary ..
.. Al I think you are losing it mate ..
WoZ of Aus 03/11/03
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Jay Canton NY

Post by Archived Reply » Sat Oct 09, 2004 12:44 am

DO I DARE CORRECT THE SAGE OF RHODE ISLAND?
EVERYTHING IS NOT RELATIVE, AL , YOU FOR EXAMPLE , ARE AN
ABSOLUTE IDIOT.
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