eighty-six: 86'd out of a bar

This formerly read-only archive of threads dates back to 1996, but as of March 2007 is open to new postings. For technical reasons, the early dates shown do not accurately reflect the actual date of posting.

Feel free to add new postings to any of the existing threads in the archived forums, but please create any new language-related threads in one of the Language Discussion Forums.

eighty-six: 86'd out of a bar

Post by Archived Reply » Mon Aug 30, 2004 7:27 am

They're new to me...we weren't allowed to watch tv when I was a kid.

Reply from Shay Simmons (Colfax - U.S.A.)
Post actions:
Signature: Reply imported and archived

eighty-six: 86'd out of a bar

Post by Archived Reply » Mon Aug 30, 2004 7:41 am

Neither was I. Of course it had barely been invented and there were few commercial units available. I saw my first one at a "rich" friend's house ca. 1947-48. Small, round, green screen. My folks finally got a B&W TV in 1957. Mainly, when I had time to watch, it was in the Dorm TV room where all us budding intellectuals would watch Yogi Bear. Those were simpler (simple?) times.

Leif
Reply from ( - )
Post actions:
Signature: Reply imported and archived

eighty-six: 86'd out of a bar

Post by Archived Reply » Mon Aug 30, 2004 7:56 am

No TV no wonder you two are fubar.
Reply from ( - )
Post actions:
Signature: Reply imported and archived

eighty-six: 86'd out of a bar

Post by Archived Reply » Mon Aug 30, 2004 8:10 am

both of you...GO TO YOUR ROOM....AND no t.v. for either of you.
nathan from san francisco
Reply from ( - )
Post actions:
Signature: Reply imported and archived

eighty-six: 86'd out of a bar

Post by Archived Reply » Mon Aug 30, 2004 8:25 am

both of you...GO TO YOUR ROOM....AND no t.v. for either of you.
nathan from san francisco
Reply from ( - )
Post actions:
Signature: Reply imported and archived

eighty-six: 86'd out of a bar

Post by Archived Reply » Mon Aug 30, 2004 8:39 am

Stop stuttering, Nathan.
Reply from ( - )
Post actions:
Signature: Reply imported and archived

eighty-six: 86'd out of a bar

Post by Archived Reply » Mon Aug 30, 2004 8:53 am

Here's the answer, according to the site linked below:

<<"Do not sell to that customer" or "The kitchen is out of the item ordered." Perhaps from the practice at Chumley's Restaurant in New York City of throwing rowdy customers out the back door, which is No. 86 Bedford Street. The term certainly predates its first appearance in print circa 1967.>>

http://homecooking.about.com/library/we ... 81897a.htm

/s/ Robert from Texas
Reply from ( - )
Post actions:
Signature: Reply imported and archived

eighty-six: 86'd out of a bar

Post by Archived Reply » Mon Aug 30, 2004 9:22 am

wow what a cool subject, i guess after reading all these responses I better 86 with my 871/2 :)
Reply from ( - )
Post actions:
Signature: Reply imported and archived

eighty-six: 86'd out of a bar

Post by Archived Reply » Mon Aug 30, 2004 9:37 am

i'm 86 'ing and 69'ing with 87 1/2...lol
Reply from ( - )
Post actions:
Signature: Reply imported and archived

eighty-six: 86'd out of a bar

Post by Archived Reply » Mon Aug 30, 2004 9:51 am

Article 86 of the UCMJ = AWOL (this seems to me to be the most likely origin)
Reply from ( - )
Post actions:
Signature: Reply imported and archived

Re: eighty-six: 86'd out of a bar

Post by Erik_Kowal » Fri Aug 06, 2010 11:36 am

Today's 'Word of the Day' email from Merriam-Webster says the following:

eighty-six

\ay-tee-SIKS\

verb, slang

Meaning

: to refuse to serve (a customer); also : to get rid of : throw out

Example Sentence

"NBC's Hannah Storm eighty-sixed her real last name, Storen, when her first employer, a heavy-metal-oriented radio station in Corpus Christi, asked her to host a show titled Storm by the Sea." (Sports Illustrated, September 25, 2000)

Did you know?

If you work in a restaurant or bar, you might eighty-six (or "eliminate") a menu item when you run out of it, or you might eighty-six (or "cut off") a customer who should no longer be served. "Eighty-six" is still used in this specific context, but it has also entered the general language. These days, you don’t have to be a worker in a restaurant or bar to eighty-six something — you just have to be someone with something to get rid of or discard. There are many popular but unsubstantiated theories about the origin of "eighty-six." The explanation judged most probable by Merriam-Webster etymologists is that the word was created as a rhyming slang word for "nix," which means "to veto" or "to reject."
Post actions:
Signature: -- Looking up a word? Try OneLook's metadictionary (--> definitions) and reverse dictionary (--> terms based on your definitions)8-- Contribute favourite diary entries, quotations and more here8 -- Find new postings easily with Active Topics8-- Want to research a word? Get essential tips from experienced researcher Ken Greenwald

End of topic.
Post Reply