manifest oneself

This formerly read-only archive of threads dates back to 1996, but as of March 2007 is open to new postings. For technical reasons, the early dates shown do not accurately reflect the actual date of posting.

Feel free to add new postings to any of the existing threads in the archived forums, but please create any new language-related threads in one of the Language Discussion Forums.
Post Reply

manifest oneself

Post by Archived Topic » Tue Aug 10, 2004 2:10 pm

Ladies and gentlemen, as I have observed, reflexive forms of verbs are used in English more rarely than in other European languages. As a result, a great lof of verbs can be used as either transitive or intransitive, depending on the context, and the paranthesised insertion `cause to' is quite common in dictionary entries explaning meanings of verbs. I can give as examples `show', `move', `get', `obtain', `shave', etc. Others are not so versatile, and pronouns like `oneself' are necessary when a subject has no other object to act upon but itself (e.g., `see', `find'). Can anybody see any regularity in this behaviour? Is the verb `manifest' used as an intransitive verb? Thank you.
A V Malyavkin, Russia
Submitted by ( - )
Post actions:
Signature: Topic imported and archived

End of topic.
Post Reply