haywire

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haywire

Post by Archived Topic » Sun May 23, 2004 9:51 am

(Actually, I know the origin of this word.) Does anyone else think something has gone haywire with our postings -- new ones appearing before old ones, some appearing as the question itself? Small children have been using my computer to play X-men, so perhaps it's just me. Maybe the X-men have taken over my hard drive....
Submitted by Linda Nevin (San Diego, CA - U.S.A.)
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haywire

Post by Archived Reply » Sun May 23, 2004 10:05 am

I knew what it meant, but I had no idea that it was the turn of the century equivalent to duct tape. Very interesting. Also had no idea that it was a "Canadianism". Thanks.
To answer your question Linda, some of the postings have gone wonky, so you are not alone.
Reply from Ian Patrick (Ottawa - Canada)
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haywire

Post by Archived Reply » Sun May 23, 2004 10:20 am

I don't know if you noticed, but the instructions on the Wordwizard site have been changed again. (Hopefully, the new instructions make it more clear that people should consult a dictionary BEFORE posting their questions, but I won't hold my breath!) It seems every time the instructions are changed, this gremlin strikes that turns postings upside-down. Coincidence? Diabolical scheme? Solar radiation? You be the judge! *G*

Jan. 14, 2002
Reply from K Allen Griffy (Springfield, IL - U.S.A.)
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Re: haywire

Post by Edwin F Ashworth » Wed Sep 28, 2011 9:40 pm

I've just checked to see if the etymology of haywire had been addressed on the site. Apparently it has, and it is a logging term. At the Online Etymology Dictionary, we read:

haywire

"soft wire for binding bales of hay," by 1891, from hay + wire. Adjective meaning "poorly equipped, makeshift" is 1905, Amer.Eng., from the sense of something only held together with haywire, particularly said to be from use of the stuff in New England lumber camps for jerry-rigging and makeshift purposes, so that hay wire outfit became the "contemptuous term for loggers with poor logging equipment" [Bryant, "Logging," 1913]. Its springy, uncontrollable quality led to the sense in go haywire (by 1915).

Canadian loggers seemed much in favour of compound words, as the examples I've emboldened suggest. Perhaps the explanation is that they were trained to use them, as one might suspect the employees of this company are:

CNPC has well-equipped and experienced well logging crews that are capable of providing services in logging, perforation, compound logging...

(at http://www.cnpc.com.cn/en/aboutcnpc/our ... s/logging/)
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