GIGI OR GEEGEE

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GIGI OR GEEGEE

Post by Archived Topic » Mon May 03, 2004 10:20 pm

WHERE DOES THE WORD/EXPRESSION "GIGI" OR "GEEGEE" REFERRING TO HORSES COME FROM
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GIGI OR GEEGEE

Post by Archived Reply » Mon May 03, 2004 10:34 pm

Not being an equestrian, how is used? Give a sample of the context.
Reply from Leif Thorvaldson (Eatonville - U.S.A.)
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GIGI OR GEEGEE

Post by Archived Reply » Mon May 03, 2004 10:49 pm

Gee -- the opposite of haw? (One's left, one's right, but I don't remember which)
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Post by Archived Reply » Mon May 03, 2004 11:03 pm

What is the entymology of chromatography
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Post by Archived Reply » Mon May 03, 2004 11:17 pm

When I used to visit betting shops, horses were referred to as geegees. A common phrase are "Are you putting something on the geegees today."

It may be from gee-up which is short for giddy-up. Hope I am making sense. Thats what we say to make a horse go. You pronounce it like its spelled.

Gigi is a French girls name. Remember the Leslie Caron/Charlie Chaplin film?
Reply from Melvyn Goodman (London - England)
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Post by Archived Reply » Mon May 03, 2004 11:32 pm

The OED sez: gee or gee-gee was orig. a child's form for "horse." The book doesn't specify which unfortunate child first called a horse a gee-gee. If I understand the cross-references correctly, gee/gee-gee is likely from "gee," a command given to a horse to make it turn right (as opposed to "haw," which is understood in universal horse language as "turn left"). "Gee, I wish you'd turn right," has been around since the 1600s. "Will you put a few Gs on the gee-gee for me?" is only about 160 years old. This must be purely a Britishism (Briticism?). Gee and haw are known in the U.S., but I've never heard anyone call a horse a gee-gee.

Linda, San Diego, CA, USA
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Post by Archived Reply » Mon May 03, 2004 11:46 pm

In that case you're probably right about it being a Britishism, Linda. 'Gee-gee' and 'horsey' are common ways for British toddlers to refer to the animals that - especially for girls - in their teenage years will become a strong focus of interest. (For an illustration of this, see the humorous drawings of Norman Thelwell, who specialised in depicting pouting little madams prancing about on ponies at gymkhanas.)
Reply from Erik Kowal ( - England)
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GIGI OR GEEGEE

Post by Archived Reply » Tue May 04, 2004 12:01 am

I should have known. I've always believed England was a country where all tots grew up with their own ponies. As a kid, I cursed my ancestors for moving from such a child-oriented and sensible land.

LN,SD,CA,USA
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Post by Archived Reply » Tue May 04, 2004 12:15 am

So you did not feel that getting to drive your own 8-litre SUV at age 15 was adequate compensation?
Reply from Erik Kowal ( - England)
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GIGI OR GEEGEE

Post by Archived Reply » Tue May 04, 2004 12:29 am

No, I'm afraid I'm of the Ford-with-the-fuzzy-dice-on-the-mirror generation. Drive your Bel Air to the sock hop, then go have a malted at the soda shop. Before the U.S. had such a stake in Mideast peace to keep the world safe for gas-guzzling SUVs. Ya can't blame that on me.

Linda, SDCAUSA


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Post by Archived Reply » Tue May 04, 2004 12:44 am

what is the origin of the word writer
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Post by Archived Reply » Tue May 04, 2004 12:58 am

What is the origin of the word "perfectionist"?
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GIGI OR GEEGEE

Post by Archived Reply » Tue May 04, 2004 1:13 am

What's the origin of the word 'annoying'
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GIGI OR GEEGEE

Post by Archived Reply » Tue May 04, 2004 1:27 am

what is the origin of those seeking origins; the bend
sinister must be prominent.
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Post by Archived Reply » Tue May 04, 2004 1:41 am

Thanks to Melvyn Goodman. I think you have it. I am from Scotland and have often heard horses referred to as gee-gees.
Tonight I was at a party with all American ladies and I told them of our Christmas tradition "christmas crackers" We pulled the paper cracked and out tumbled a paper hat, a toy and a joke. The joke was "how wold you describe a hungry horse in four letters? The answer was MTGG. No one lauged except me. They had never heard the expression "gee-gee. and of course the Christmas Crackers (not for eating) were made in England. Thanks for your input Melvyn - I need confirmation that I did not make up the expression because I could not find it in my condensed Oxford Dictionary.
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