MUCKET

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MUCKET

Post by Archived Topic » Fri Apr 16, 2004 10:34 am

I have been searching for the historical use and source of the word mucket. I have been told that it is term for a female pubic toupee. Interested anything related to finding out about the word and actual use of a mucket. Who would need one of these? and why? is it where the term "muff" developed from in referring to the vagina?

Aimee England
Hillsdale, MI

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MUCKET

Post by Archived Reply » Fri Apr 16, 2004 10:49 am

The OED doesn't include "mucket." The word you may be looking for is probably mirkin. By 1535 it meant "the female pudendum." By 1617 it was "counterfeit hair for a woman's privy parts." According to my research, it may have come from the theater, since men often played women's parts and much of the fare was bawdy. I guess they wore a merkin like a G-string. Merkins were also worn by prostitutes who had lost their body hair because of disease and didn't want to scare away the customers. I've read that even as late as WWII this was true. And you can still buy custom merkins from theatrical wig makers.

Under "merkin," the OED refers you to "malkin/maukin." In the 1200s, malkin was a name used to refer to a low-class woman, so this may be related to the word's origin.

Linda, San Diego, CA, USA
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MUCKET

Post by Archived Reply » Fri Apr 16, 2004 11:03 am

Linda: If you, like any other contributors not automatically recognised on the site, want to save yourself the effort of identifying yourself manually in your future contributions, I suggest you go to:

http://www.wordwizard.com/newuser/default.htm

which is the joining page.

The page:

http://www.wordwizard.com/clubhouse/fou ... sp?Num=804

will tell you what to do if you ever lose your Word Wizard ID.
Reply from Erik Kowal ( - England)
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MUCKET

Post by Archived Reply » Fri Apr 16, 2004 11:17 am

From Cassell's Dictionary of Slang (1998) by Jonathon Green:
mucket n. [1950s-60s] (US) a hairpiece or toupe. [? var. on SE "merkin," a pubic wig]
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Wentworth & Flexner's Dictionary of American Slang (1960) gives simply: "mucket n. A toupee."
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It's generally known that for screen purposes I wear a device the trade calls "a scalp doily," "a mucket" or "a divot." ... Donning a mucket. Not that it's such a chore to put on, but the glue in it makes my forehead itch. (Saturday Evening Post, 14 March 1953)
Reply from Susumu Enomoto (Shiraokamachi - Japan)
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MUCKET

Post by Archived Reply » Fri Apr 16, 2004 11:32 am

For nearly twenty five years I have been vexed with the perplexing term...mucket! Thank you all so much for putting my curiosity to rest!

While serving in the U.S. Navy in the early 70's, all rookie fighter squadron members were issued nicknames by the old salts. One such member, was dubbed "Mucket Meyer". We were told that a "mucket" was a toupe for a vagina, (I have intentionally omitted the slang term we really used), but I thought they were crazy!!

Once again, thanks!! Another mystery solved in my life's travels!!
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Re: MUCKET

Post by rruppert » Thu Aug 02, 2018 9:51 pm

From historical American Civil War writings we have the cups carried by soldiers: Covered Tin Cup (Stainless Steel) [Boiler/Mucket]: This Covered Cup/Boiler/Mucket is spun with no seams on the bottom. It is 5 1/2" high and 4" in diameter (not counting handle) made from a non shiny stainless steel so it will will not corrode or rust.

see They Met at Shiloh and this site: http://shop.ushist.com/american_civil-w ... ment.shtml
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