Opposite of 'Xenophobe'

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Opposite of 'Xenophobe'

Post by Archived Topic » Wed Apr 14, 2004 4:34 pm

We know that the term 'xenophobe' means 'A person unduly fearful or contemptuous of that which is foreign, especially of strangers or foreign peoples' (The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language: Fourth Edition. 2000). Thus, it's literal opposite would mean 'A person unduly affectionate of that which is foreign, especially of strangers or foreign peoples.'

Another 'opposite' (if you will) of 'xenophobe' might mean 'A person unduly contemptuous of that which belongs to his race or culture.'

Any help here with either of these terms?

Thanks.

Jim Wolf
San Francisco

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Opposite of 'Xenophobe'

Post by Archived Reply » Wed Apr 14, 2004 4:49 pm

Some clarification of the original question...

In another thread, the term 'misoxene' is defined as a 'hater of strangers'; thus, what would be the appropriate term to describe a 'hater of one's own kind'?

Thanks again.

JW

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Opposite of 'Xenophobe'

Post by Archived Reply » Wed Apr 14, 2004 5:03 pm

Webster's defines 'xenophile' as a 1945-50 term meaning 'a person who is attracted to foreign peoples, cultures or customs'. Hence 'xenophilia' (1955-60).

Perhaps I should coin 'xenopatriotism' to describe 'hatred of one's own country'.
Reply from Erik Kowal ( - England)
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Opposite of 'Xenophobe'

Post by Archived Reply » Wed Apr 14, 2004 5:17 pm

I don't think 'xenopatriotism' would mean 'hatred of one's own country', since 'xeno-' means 'strange, alien or foreign'. Rather, 'xenopatriotism' would be oxymoronic.

Another way to approach this, however, is to identify the antonym of 'xeno-'. I.e., what is the appropriate combining form for 'familiar' or 'intimate' or 'race'?

Thanks again.

JW
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Post by Archived Reply » Wed Apr 14, 2004 5:32 pm

JW: I don't know if I would accept such a suggestion from an old ximelolagniac such as Erik. Witness his proclivity for myriadigamy. *G*
Reply from Leif Thorvaldson (Eatonville - U.S.A.)
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Opposite of 'Xenophobe'

Post by Archived Reply » Wed Apr 14, 2004 5:46 pm

I am a bit worried that so many of the English definitions we are getting come from people called Thorvaldson and Kowal, not to mention Goodman.

Does this mean I am becoming xenophobic.

Incidentally I have just returned from Paris. They have given up trying to protect the French language. There are signs all over the place for LUNCH PARKING STOP QUICK and SHOP not to mention Disneyland and Macdonalds.

Mel G London
Reply from Melvyn Goodman (London - England)
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Post by Archived Reply » Wed Apr 14, 2004 6:01 pm

The French give up? Our good man, better hope that Hélène doesn't read this thread. She'll have your guts for garters. Another quaint English phrase. By the way, I wonder how you prepare them? I imagine the French would do a far better job in doing so! Hélène? Any good recipes pour boyau à la jarretière?


Reply from Leif Thorvaldson (Eatonville - U.S.A.)
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Post by Archived Reply » Wed Apr 14, 2004 6:15 pm

Yes ! The recipe is quite simple : the only necessary ingredients are a a pair of strong hands...( to have someone's guts for garnets = tordre le cou de quelqu'un -wring someone's neck)
Melvyn's choice of words :"given up trying to protect" the French language is most interesting...and deserves some attention... that (aborted ) attempt to "protect" the French language as you put it dates back to the time when one of our "ministre de la culture" decided English words should be banned and translated into French whenever possible. ( Why not ? )
A lot of people made fun of him, I'm afraid.I love English a lot,yet I think foreign words could / should be avoided if they can be translated in one's language and are just as explicit and clear...
Touchy as I may (sometimes ) be as far as French is concerned,like everybody else "je fais du "shopping" " (it is much funnier than "faire des courses" / des achats"...) and "j'ai des problèmes de parking"....I would like to specify that in Quebec they fight tooth and nail to preserve their language, and they translate everything into French.It may sometimes sound funny for us French, but my hat to them, anyway !


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Opposite of 'Xenophobe'

Post by Archived Reply » Wed Apr 14, 2004 6:29 pm

Brava, Hélène! I suspect that more and more of the language will be "lost" in that way. The enormous communications web throughout the world and the fact that English has become the "lingua Franca" of commerce and industry (as French once was) means that the encroachment will be even more severe -- especially from the young. I tease my Norwegian relatives with saying that anyone can speak Norwegian if they know a few basic Norwegian verbs to sprinkle between English nouns and modifiers. So many of the scientific and electronic developments are coming from the English speaking countries that it is simpler for another language to simply use them as loan words rather than make up something in their own language.
Have you rested up from faire-ing votre holidays, Hélène? *G*
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Post by Archived Reply » Wed Apr 14, 2004 6:44 pm

I'm sorry--I'm enjoying the mental image of Helene wearing Melvyn's guts as garnets!
Reply from Shay Simmons (Colfax - U.S.A.)
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Opposite of 'Xenophobe'

Post by Archived Reply » Wed Apr 14, 2004 6:58 pm

I guess she considers Mel as being a semi-precious gem!
Reply from Leif Thorvaldson (Eatonville - U.S.A.)
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Opposite of 'Xenophobe'

Post by Archived Reply » Wed Apr 14, 2004 7:13 pm

I'm known as someone with a sense of humour...
How come I've just lost it ???
Reply from Hélène GOMEZ (Brest - France)
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Opposite of 'Xenophobe'

Post by Archived Reply » Wed Apr 14, 2004 7:27 pm

Perhaps that necklace of garnets you're wearing is too tight, Helene, garroting you. Or garrotting. Or ever grrr-rotting. Forgive my garrulity; my garter's a little tight, too.
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