Poplollies and Bellibones

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Poplollies and Bellibones

Post by Archived Reply » Mon Feb 09, 2004 6:46 am

A good question Sidney, and one that will gnaw at me for many a long, sleepless night. Just be hopeful that you never develop Sesquipedalophobia.
Reply from Doug Gilbert (Chai Yi - Taiwan)
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Poplollies and Bellibones

Post by Archived Reply » Mon Feb 09, 2004 7:01 am

In going through this list I am amazed that no one has entered anything about "bellibones", a perfectly good, but archaic word. According to Peter Bowler in his small but interesting book, The Superior Person's Book of Words:
BELLIBONE; n. Believe it or not, "a woman excelling both in beauty and goodness" (Dr. Johnson's Dictionary). One of a few words that the author has taken the liberty of disinterring from the past (even Johnson refers to it as "not in present use") because of their obvious potentialities in polite discourse.
Poplollies is a variant of lollipop, the hard candy on a stick.

Reply from Charles Becker (Murray KY - U.S.A.)
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Poplollies and Bellibones

Post by Archived Reply » Mon Feb 09, 2004 7:15 am

Thanks Charlie for this most useful word. Now I know what to call myself. *G*
Reply from Meirav Barkan (London - England)
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Re: Poplollies and Bellibones

Post by Erik_Kowal » Sun Aug 14, 2011 7:25 am

I would hazard a guess (and it's no more than that) that 'bellibone' is a corruption of the French 'belle et bonne' (meaning 'beautiful and good' in relation to someone or something having a grammatically feminine gender).
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