Poplollies and Bellibones

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Poplollies and Bellibones

Post by Archived Reply » Tue Feb 03, 2004 9:10 am

You people are a hoot. I'm glad I found this site. Thanks.

Linda. Corpus Christi, Tx.
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Poplollies and Bellibones

Post by Archived Topic » Sun Feb 08, 2004 11:49 pm

This is the title of a book I've acquired, subtitled 'A Celebration of Lost Words' by Susan Kelz Sperling, ISBN 0 14 00.5190 2

'snirtle' and 'downsteepy' have already made a comeback in our family. Anyone else intersted in archaic words?

They certainly come in hand in world-creation.

L&S
Submitted by Sidney Blackburn (London - Canada)
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Poplollies and Bellibones

Post by Archived Reply » Mon Feb 09, 2004 12:03 am

Here is a sentence for all you mumsimus pheme golliards out there.


It's certainly a good idea to have some hidegild in case your ambodexter doesn't work. And if all else fails, be ready with the necke-verse.
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Poplollies and Bellibones

Post by Archived Reply » Mon Feb 09, 2004 12:17 am

Sidney - Lost & Searching?
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Poplollies and Bellibones

Post by Archived Reply » Mon Feb 09, 2004 12:32 am

Don't you mean 'lhoaverd' & 'stiweard'?
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Post by Archived Reply » Mon Feb 09, 2004 12:46 am

Doug, stop showing off - we know it's only your cd-rom.
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Post by Archived Reply » Mon Feb 09, 2004 1:01 am

Meirav -

Light and Shadows

I've already found most of the lost stuff. (although, if you see my library card anywhere...<g>)

My kids are thigging for bed, I'll check in anon...

Light and Glorious Shadows,
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Post by Archived Reply » Mon Feb 09, 2004 1:15 am

Sidney, my curiosity remains unabated. Am I missing some reference that *simply everyone* knows? What's "Light and Shadows" all about? Prey enlighten me (once your kids have stopped "thigging" - whatever that may be).
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Post by Archived Reply » Mon Feb 09, 2004 1:29 am

By the time I'm wishing the thigging kids were for bed, I know I've had a long day and it might explain the missing library card. My personal favorite source for oldities is my 1933 Roget's Thesaurus with such wonders as vellicating, escharotic, wallsend, locofoco, athanor, bifurcous, hortative. Perhaps some of these are not old, but they are certainly not in common use in my neighborhood.
Reply from Sabine Harmann (Elkhorn, WI - U.S.A.)
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Post by Archived Reply » Mon Feb 09, 2004 1:44 am

Meirav,

"thigging" - begging

Light and Shadows is not something *everyone knows*. Those two words carry a great deal of freight with me, on multiple levels. They remind me that I am not perfect and should temper my judgements of other people. They also serve to remind me that too much of *anything* can be bad for you, even the 'good' (Light) stuff; sometimes the Shadows ('bad') can be beneficial. And maybe the key to a successful life is a balance of the two.

Using 'Light and Shadows' as a way of signing, instead of 'Sincerely', is my way of wishing those I correspond with a sane mixture of highs and lows, a balanced life. A Grey life...*G*, but that's a whole 'nother story!
=================================

More on archaic words...I've found some of them absolutely charming, esp. the portmanteaus, and I use the ones I think may deserve a second chance around the house. If nothing else, it will give the kids a story about their 'weird' mother (like they don't have enough). Who knows, it may start something!

I like 'downsteepy' instead of 'precipitous'. I like 'darg' for a day's work. "After a hard darg...". I like the word 'hadavist' which means sort of 'If only I'd known!' and sort of 'damn! I missed that!' They're fun, they're different.

Of course, on the other side, I'm also fascinated by how words that do stay in the language change...like acquaintance...and I was surprise to read a letter from 1898 wherein the writer said he was 'bumming around' the city. I would have guessed that expression was newer.

L&S,


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Post by Archived Reply » Mon Feb 09, 2004 1:58 am

Dear Sid:
Your "Light and Shadows" is something like "Every cloud has a silver lining" ?
It reminds me of the words from a Japanimation twenty or more years ago:
"Where there is light, there is a shadow."
BTW, "bumming around" is around in 1863.
"They are just fit to stay in this city, vegetate in the back slums, read the News and Express, bum round rum-shops...."


Reply from Susumu Enomoto (Shiraokamachi - Japan)
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Post by Archived Reply » Mon Feb 09, 2004 2:13 am

Susumu,

"Every cloud has a silver lining" has too many chipper conotations...*G*. More like, "Into each life a little rain must fall." The idea that 'bad' things, in certain measure, are necessary.

But just as the rain that cancels the holiday picnic makes the garden grow, a torrential downpour washes the seeds away. Everything in moderation.

There are no Shadows, you see, without Light to cast them...

*concludes deep philosophical thought of the day*

Light and Glorious Shadows,

Reply from Sidney Blackburn (London - Canada)
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Post by Archived Reply » Mon Feb 09, 2004 2:27 am

I was taken by a couple of your examples of archaic words and wondered if they might not have Norse or Danish origins. Since the Scandinavians were so "seminally" involved in the British Isles, their efforts produced many off-shoots among them the inclusion of Scandinavian words and phrases into the then existing English language. Perhaps Erik might comment on this also. I am guessing that the word "hardavist" stems from the Norwegian and perhaps Danish phrase "hadde jeg visst" which translates precisely as Sidney has it. Also, the term "darg" could equally well come from the Scandinavian word "dag" (day). Just speculation. Maybe the OED types might spin up their disks and see if there are any references?
Reply from Leif Thorvaldson (Eatonville - U.S.A.)
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Post by Archived Reply » Mon Feb 09, 2004 2:41 am

Hmm, yes, the downside to the book is that the author doesn't annotate her entries. All the words are listed as 'archaic' but she seldom mentions just *when* it was in vogue, or an etymology.

She does say that a 'prick-song' is a song in which the notes were written (pricked) down, as opposed to plain-song (unwritten) and that 'poplolly' is from the French 'poupelet' and 'ha-ha' meaning a hole you don't know about until you step in it is from the Anglo-Saxon 'hoeh' meaning hole.

Now, 'spiss' meaning thick or dense, there's one to wonder about! Spiss... like a nice spiss gravy? Or my spiss sister? I read a spiss story at Zuzu's Petals...heh. Spiss. Word of the day.

Light and Spiss Shadows,

Reply from Sidney Blackburn (London - Canada)
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Post by Archived Reply » Mon Feb 09, 2004 2:56 am

Leif - My OED doesn't have 'hardavist' listed, but that doesn't mean that you aren't right. Sometimes, just looking at a word can give you an idea as to what it might mean. But alas, this isn't one of those times. Perhaps a greater wizard than I can take a crack at it.

The word 'darg' simply means 'day's work'. Here's what the OED has to say about it and the first citation.

"darg (____). Sc. and north. dial. Also 5 dawerk, dawark, 8 daurk, 9 daark, dark, darrak, darroch, dargue, daurg,

[A syncopated form of daywerk, or daywark, daywork, through the series of forms dawark, *da’ark, dark, darg, the latter being now the common form in Scotland.]

A day’s work, the task of a day; also, a defined quantity or amount of work, or of the product of work, done in a certain time or at a certain rate of payment; a task.

c1425 Wyntoun Chron. ix. xiv. 44 (Jam.) That duleful dawerk that tyme wes done."

Since the word originally comes from Scotland, I would say that it wouldn't have a Scandinavian origin. Unless they got it from your Viking forebears. I may be wrong but I don't think that the Vikings had many permanent settlements that far north.
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